Historic Pelham

Presenting the rich history of Pelham, NY in Westchester County: current historical research, descriptions of how to research Pelham history online and genealogy discussions of Pelham families.

Friday, February 10, 2017

United Brothers' Land Society Involvement in Developing Pelhamville Lands in the Early 1850s


Introduction

Between about 1845 and late 1848, plans for a "New-York and New-Haven Railroad" through the Town of Pelham became a reality.  The line was completed when the last rails were laid over the Cos Cob Bridge on Christmas Day, 1848.  The same day, a trainload of "gentlemen" departed from New York for a trip on the new line to New Haven.  They returned the next day.  See Thu., Sep. 11, 2014:  Cattle Were Frightened; Animals Careened Round the Fields - The First Run of the New Haven Line Through Pelham in 1848.

The coming of the railroad was, of course, a monumental event for the rural and undeveloped area encompassed by the Town of Pelham.  Interestingly, the timing of the opening of the railroad fundamentally affected the very soul of two large residential areas in the Town in ways that can easily be seen today.  

In 1848 when the first part of the New Haven line opened through Pelham, The mid-Victorian Freehold Land Movement that spread throughout England and the U.S. was reaching its peak.   "Freehold Land Societies" (also known as Building Societies and Building Associations) were active throughout the region as land developers seized on the movement as a way quickly to sell many small plots to members of the working class who dreamed of owning their own homes.  In short, the movement encouraged the formation of small terminating building societies to assist members of the working class to buy homes as a step toward self respect and shared, mutual improvement.  

The movement has been studied for many years.  As one expert has noted:

"It was usual . . . for mid-Victorians to think of house-ownership as the preserve of a section of the upper working class . . . a quirk of a small minority of skilled artisans who set especial store on thrift and respectability, saw them as ideally embodied in house-ownership, and successfully pursued their ambitions through the machinery of local terminating building societies. . . . Freehold land societies provided their members with freehold properties, together with the associated advantage of a parliamentary vote.  In the years following the embarrassment of Chartism in 1848, the freehold land movement came close to dominating popular politics.  Its roots were those common to Chartism:  the imperative to extend the franchise, working-class self-respect and mutual improvement, and agrarian idealism. . . . Such societies were a powerful means of converting thrift into consumption. . ."

Source:   Chase, Malcom, "Out of Radicalism:  the Mid-Victorian Freehold Land Movement" in Engl. Hist. Review, 1991, Vol. CVI (CCCCXIX), pp. 319-45, & 319.  

With the coming of the railroad to Pelham, New York City in late 1848, real estate developers seized on the opportunity and formed a number of building societies to develop the areas known as Pelhamville and Prospect Hill within the Town of Pelham.  (Other building societies operated nearby at the same time, particularly in Mount Vernon.)  Developers formed a freehold land society named United Brothers' Land Society to sell lots in Pelhamville.  Another building society named the Prospect Hill Village Association was formed to sell lots in Prospect Hill.  There was some overlapping management and involvement between the two associations that strongly suggests a coordinated effort to sell real estate in the two sections of the Town.

I have written extensively about the Prospect Hill Village Association.  For examples, see:

Bell, Blake A., The Founding of "Prospect Hill Village" in the Early 1850s, The Pelham Weekly, Vol. XV, Issue 25, Second Section, Jun. 23, 2006, p. 34, col. 1.

Tue., Jul. 26, 2016:  More About the Prospect Hill Village Association in the Mid-19th Century.

Fri., Feb. 12, 2010:  Documentation of the Creation of the Building Association Known as Prospect Hill Village Association on August 11, 1852.

Thu., Oct. 15, 2009:  19th and Early 20th Century Newspaper Notices Relating to the Prospect Hill Village Association.

Mon., Nov. 21, 2005:  Prospect Hill and Pelhamville Depicted on the 1868 Beers Atlas Map of Pelham: Part I.

Wed., Mar. 30, 2005:  Prospect Hill Village -- Yet Another Early Hamlet Within the Town of Pelham


Today's Historic Pelham article tells the story of the United Brothers' Land Society involved in the development of a portion of Pelhamville (as well as some of the overlapping ties between that society and the Prospect Hill Village Association).

United Brothers' Land Society

The United Brothers' Land Society was organized in New York City on June 3, 1850.  The organization was limited to 500 members.  Its object was "to procure a sufficient quantity of land in our locality, so as to enable each of its members to have 100 feet square (four City lots) for a Homestead at the expiration of one year from the date of organization."  Based in New York City, the Society held periodic meetings at a variety of Manhattan locations including 127 Grand Street and Convention Hall at 175 Wooster Street.  

The Society promptly acquired about 110 acres of land in Pelhamville with frontage of about 800 feet on the New-York and New-Haven Railroad line.  It appears that among the land acquired by the Society was the Anthony Wolf homestead (i.e., the home and farm of John Anthony Woolf).  The Wolf home once stood on the north side of Third Street between today's Fifth Avenue and Sixth Avenue.  For more about John Anthony Woolf and his farm, see:  

Thu., Aug. 27, 2015:  More About Anthony Wolf of Wolfs Lane Fame Who Built the Wolf Homestead that Once Stood in Pelhamville.  

Wed., Aug. 26, 2015:  Stories About The Old Wolf Homestead in Pelhamville, Told by J. Gardiner Minard.  

The Society purchased the Pelhamville lands for $16,000.  It agreed to pay that sum through installments over the course of one year as it took membership fees and sold rights to own lots to its members.  Interestingly, numerous secondary sources (that seem to base their assertions on the work of Lockwood Barr in his seminal history of Pelham published in 1946) contend that a land association named the Pelhamville Village Association bought the Wolf farm, subdivided it, and sold off the lots.  There does not, however, seem to be any compelling evidence to support that claim.  It seems certain that the United Brothers' Land Society was the "Associative movement of the Mechanics and Laboring men" of New York City responsible for purchasing and subdividing the land -- not any organization often referenced as the Pelhamville Village Association.  It seems that such a misnomer was applied in some contexts as a shorthand reference for the United Brothers' Land Society.  In any event, it is clear that the United Brothers' Land Society was the building society that developed much of Pelhamville.

The first order of business for the Society was to whip up interest among prospective purchasers to convince them to join the association and begin installment payments on Pelhamville lots to get money flowing into the organization so the organization could make its own installment payments toward its $16,000 debt.  What better day than Thanksgiving Day for a "Festival" at Pelhamville to whip up such interest!  

Thanksgiving was not yet a national holiday but, by 1850, it had become a national tradition.  It was celebrated on different dates near the end of the year in different States and territories.  In New York, Thanksgiving was celebrated on December 12, 1850.

That day, the United Brothers' Land Society sponsored a special "First Festival at Pelhamville."  A special train departed from the New-Haven Depot at Canal Street at 10:00 a.m. for Pelhamville.  There, in almost a caricature of the traditions followed by building societies throughout our region, a brass band led prospective purchasers from the train to the lands offered for sale.  According to a notice of the event:  "The cars will return at 3 P.M. on account of the ladies and children."  (See below.)

The United Brothers' Land Society raised roughly $21,000 through sales of certificates entitling members to specified lots in Pelhamville, leaving about a $5,000 surplus to permit construction of a railroad depot and "for cutting streets, grading, &c."  It appears that the money was handled as follows.

Prospective "members" paid an "entrance fee."  After paying the fee, they selected their plot(s) and received a certificate reflecting their choice(s).  Thereafter, the members began making periodic installment payments with the goal of paying for their selected plot(s) within one year.  Some fell into arrears, though the Society periodically provided opportunities to bring such arrears current.  Once the installment payments were paid in full, members were provided an opportunity to exchange their certificates for the deeds to their land.

Governance of the organization seemed to involve a board of trustees, a few officers, and several committees comprised of members of the Society.  One such committee was the Finance Committee.  Another was the Land Committee.  A third was the Surveying Committee.  Another was the Committee on Arrangements.  Officers included:

William Parker, President
T. Huxley, Vice President
Charles Keen, Secretary
Henry Marsden, Trustee
Charles Wilkie, Chairman of the Executive Committee
Alfred B. Duncombe, "on the Land"

Among the things the United Brothers' Land Society did was construct the first railroad station built in Pelham.  The tiny little station was described as "a neat and commodious depot" and was reported as "on point of completion at a cost of $1,350" in a letter to the editor of the New-York Daily Tribune published on June 17, 1851.  

The Society claimed success in its mission.  The one-year anniversary of the organization passed on June 3, 1851.  Three days later on Friday, June 6, 1851, members of the Society met at the Fourteenth Ward Hotel, southeast corner of Elizabeth and Grand streets, "for the purpose of winding up the affairs of the society."  

Two days later, on Sunday, June 8, 1851, the Society published the following notice in the New York Herald:

"in accordance with the resolution passed at the last meeting, they shall meet at the New York and New Haven Railroad Station, on Monday morning, June 9, 1851, at seven o'clock, for the purpose of proceeding to Pelhamville, where the distribution of lots will take place.  N. B. -- The house and lot, formerly occupied by Andrew Woolf, will be sold by auction after the distribution."

The following day, Monday, June 9, 1851, the Pelhamville lots were distributed to those who purchased them.  

In a matter of weeks, the Society published a notice soliciting proposals "for grading and regulating the streets and avenues; also, for sinking and stoning up a well, to contain five feet of pure water, at the railroad depot."  It appears as though the Society was using the "surplus" funds it had received to develop the streets of the new settlement.

It appears that there were a number of surplus lots and an "old building" with a quantity of cut wood that remained unsold after lots were distributed to members on June 9.  Accordingly,  a brief notice appeared in the pages of the New York Herald on September 11, 1851.  The item announced an auction of all "surplus lots" of the United Brothers' Land Society in Pelhamville and further stated that the society's building and all its "Cut Wood" would be included in the auction.  An image of the advertisement and a transcription of its text appear immediately below.



The New York Herald, Sep. 11, 1851, No. 6895, Morning
Edition, p. 3, col. 5.

"PELHAMVILLE LOTS AT AUCTION. -- BY ORDER OF the United Brothers' Land Society, the surplus lots marked on map from A to Y inclusive, will be sold on the ground at Pelhamville, on Monday next, the 15th instant at one o'clock, by public auction, to the highest bidder.  Also one old Building and all the Cut Wood belonging to the Society.  Twenty per cent to be paid on lots when sold, and the balance on delivery of the deeds.  The building and wood to be paid for in full at the time of sale.

H. MARSDEN, Trustee.

The New Haven cars leave Canal street at half-past eleven o'clock, A.M."

The following month, on Monday, October 13, 1851, members of the Society met at Convention Hall at 175 Wooster Street, "to hear the report of the executive committee, and transact general business, preparatory to an early close of the society."  It appears, however, that the Society still had not dissolved as of six months later.  Thus, in late April, 1852, a series of notices appeared in New York City providing as follows:

"UNITED BROTHERS' LAND SOCIETY. -- BY ORDER of the Society, the south half of lot No. 128, in Pelhamville, is to be sold.  Persons wishing to buy will please send in their bids, with names and residences, in writing, to Henry Marsden, No. 40 Thompson street, before Monday evening, April 26th, in order that the Executive Committee may award it to the highest bidder.  Terms cash, on delivery of the deed."

Research has not yet revealed when the United Brothers' Land Society actually closed down.  It seems to have been sometime soon after late April in 1852.  Though it would be years before any meaningful number of people built homes on the lots and settled in Pelhamville, the work of the United Brothers' Land Society had formed the basic layout that defines much of today's Village of Pelham. 

Overlaps Between United Brothers' Land Society and Prospect Hill Village Association

There are some obvious and long-known overlaps between the development of Prospect Hill and Pelhamville.  For example, both were developed at essentially the same time.  Both relied on a New Rochelle architect and civil engineer, William Bryson, to prepare survey and lot maps.  Both were known to have been developed by land societies.

The overlaps, however, seem to go much deeper.  For example, William Parker, who served as the President of the United Brothers' Land Society, also served as Secretary of the Prospect Hill Village Association and owned land in the Prospect Hill development.  See, e.g., Prospect Hill Village Association, New-York Tribune, Vol. XI, No. 3266, Oct. 6, 1851, p. 2, col. 1 (Prospect Hill Village Association notice of meeting signed by "WM. PARKER, Secretary, No. 192 Canal-st.").

There also is admittedly circumstantial evidence that advertising for the two building societies was coordinated.  On a number of occasions, advertisements for both appeared in the same sections of the same publications.  Occasionally, notices published by the two associations even appeared adjacent to one another.



Meeting Notices for Both the United Brothers' Land Society
and the Prospect Hill Village Association that Appeared Adjacent
to One Another.  Source:  UNITED BROTHERS' LAND SOCIEty
and PROSPECT HILL VILLAGE AssociationThe Sun [NY, NY],
Aug. 4, 1851, No. 5551, p. 3, col. 1.  NOTE:  Click on Image to Enlarge.



Map of Pelhamville Published in 1868.  Source:  Beers, F.W., Atlas
of New York and Vicinity from Actual Surveys By and Under the
Direction of F.W. Beers, Assisted By A.B. Prindle & Others, pg. 36
(NY, NY: Beers, Ellis & Soule, 1868) (Detail from Page 36 Map
(With) Pelhamville).  NOTE:  Click on Image to Enlarge.


*          *          *          *          *

Below is the text of a number of items that relate to the subject of today's article.  Each is followed by a citation and link to its source.

"MEETINGS THIS EVENING.  --  The City Industrial Congress at their rooms, New City Hall; Benevolent Society of Operative Masons, 76 Prince st. near Broadway; and the United Brothers Land Society, 127 Grand st."

Source:  MEETINGS THIS EVENING, New-York Daily Tribune, Sep. 24, 1850, p. 4, col. 5.

"First Festival at Pelhamville of the United Brothers' Land Society, who have founded the above village on a beautiful site in Westchester County, adjoining the New-Haven Railroad, on Thanksgiving Day.  A Special Train of Cars will be in readiness at the New-Haven Depot in Canal-st. at 10 o'clock, A. M. with a fine Band of Music to accompany the Society to their lands.  The public are respectfully invited to attend.  The cars will return at 3 P.M. on account of the ladies and children.  By order of the Committee of Arrangements.
WM. PARKER, President.
CHARLES KEEN, Secretary.     d11 lt*"

Source:  First Festival at Pelhamville, New-York Daily Tribune, Dec. 11, 1850, Vol. X, No. 3012, p. 1, col. 2.  

"THE UNITED BROTHERS' LAND SOCIETY MEET this evening, at 7 1/2 o'clock, at the Hall 127 Grand street.  Members who have only paid an entrance fee, and those in arrear, are requested to come forward and pay up.  A few shares are yet left.  Respectable and industrious men are requested to join this society.  Every member of the Land and Surveying Committees are urgently requested to meet at the Hall, at 6 1/2 o'clock.  By order of the President.

WM. PARKER
CHAS. KEEN, Sec'y."

Source:  THE UNITED BROTHERS' LAND SOCIETY MEET [Advertisement], New York Herald, Mar. 18, 1851, p. 5, col. 2.  

"The United Brothers Land Society will hold a meeting at the Fourteenth Ward, S. E. corner of Elizabeth and Grand sts. on FRIDAY EVENING, June 6, at 7 1/2 o'clock.  N. B. -- The Finance Committee meet daily at 127 Grand st. for the purpose of winding up the affairs of the Society.
WM. PARKER, President.
CHAS. KEEN, Secretary.    je3 2t*"

Source:  The United Brothers Land Society, New-York Daily Tribune, Jun. 5, 1851, Vol. XI, No. 3162, p. 1, col. 1.  

"THE UNITED BROTHERS LAND SOCIETY WILL hold a meeting at the Fourteenth Ward Hotel, southeast corner of Elizabeth and Grand streets, on Friday, June 6th, at 7 1/2 P.M.  N. B. -- The Finance Committee meet daily at 127 Grand street, for the purpose of winding up the affairs of the society.

W. PARKER, Pres't.
C. KEEN, Secretary."

Source:  THE UNITED BROTHERS LAND SOCIETY [Advertisement], New York Herald, Jun. 6, 1851, p. 3, col. 1.  

"THE UNITED BROTHERS' LAND SOCIETY ARE hereby notified that, in accordance with the resolution passed at the last meeting, they shall meet at the New York and New Haven Railroad Station, on Monday morning, June 9, 1851, at seven o'clock, for the purpose of proceeding to Pelhamville, where the distribution of lots will take place.  N. B. -- The house and lot, formerly occupied by Andrew Woolf, will be sold by auction after the distribution.

W. PARKER, President."

Source:  THE UNITED BROTHERS' LAND SOCIETY [Advertisement], New York Herald, Jun. 8, 1851, p. 3, col. 3.  

"Homes for the Working Men.

To the Editor of the Tribune:

SIR:  As you take an interest in the Associative movements of the Mechanics and Laboring men of our City, I thought a brief account of the commencement and successful termination of the United Brothers Land Society would prove acceptable to your readers.

The U. B. L. Society was organized on the 3d day of June, 1850.  Their number was not to exceed 500 men.  Their object was to procure a sufficient quantity of land in our locality, so as to enable each of its members to have 100 feet square (four City lots) for a Homestead at the expiration of one year from the date of organization.  The land (110 acres) is situated in Westchester Co., about 17 miles from the City Hall, having a front of about 800 feet on the New York and New-Haven Railroad.  On Tuesday, 3d of June, the year expired, and on Monday, 9th, the distribution of lots took place at Pelhamville, and the object for which we are associated was successfully accomplished, we having paid the last installment of $16,000, (the amount agreed upon for the land,) on that day, leaving a surplus of about $5,000 for cutting streets, grading, &c., at a cost of about $51 to each man.  We have a neat and commodious depot on point of completion at a cost of $1,350.

No little credit is due the officers, and especially Mr. James [sic; should be William] Parker, President of the Association for the self-sacrificing energy and perseverance he has manifested in bringing the affairs of the society to a final and successful termination, thereby enabling numbers to escape the power of the Landlord, and opening before them the vista of a bright and happy future.

JOHN W. LINSTED, 109 Eldridge-st."

Source:  Homes for the Working Men, New-York Daily Tribune, Jun. 17, 1851, p. 7, col. 3.

"UNITED BROTHERS LAND ASSOCIATION AT PELhamville.  --  Proposals will be received for grading and regulating the streets and avenues; also, for sinking and stoning up a well, to contain five feet of pure water, at the railroad depot.  All information will be given by applying to

WILLIAM PARKER, President, or
ALFRED B. DUNCOMBE, on the land."

Source:  UNITED BROTHERS LAND ASSOCIATION [Advertisement], New York Herald, Jun. 26, 1851, p. 3, col. 6.

"UNITED BROTHERS' LAND SOCIETY.  THE NEXT REGULAR MEETING will be held at Mechanics' Hall, 160 Hester st. between Elizabeth and Mott sts. on Monday evening, July 11th, at 8 o'clock.  N. B. -- Every constitutional member of the society is requested to be present to attend to his own interests, and the future welfare of the association.  By order of the President, WM. PARKER.CHAS. KEEN, Sec'y.  153"

Source:  UNITED BROTHERS' LAND SOCIETY -- THE NEXT REGULAR MEETING, The Sun [NY, NY], Jul. 14, 1851, No. 5533, p. 2, col. 1.  

"UNITED BROTHERS' LAND SOCIEty -- The next regular meeting will be held on Monday, August the 4th, at 8 o'clock P.M. at Mechanics' Hall, 160 Hester st., between Elizabeth and Mott sts.  CHAS KEEN, Sec'y.  T. HUXLEY, Vice President.     148

PROSPECT HILL VILLAGE Association -- On Monday evening, 4th of August, at 8 o'clock, this Society will hold its next regular meeting at American Hall, corner of Broadway and Grand sts., for the purpose of receiving new members, &c.  Every person who wants a plot of land in the most healthy location in Westchester Co. is requested to attend, get a prospectus and constitution, and by weekly installments, pay for their future home.  For further information apply to ALFRED S. PEACE, Presdt. 161 Third ave. or of WM. PARKER, 192 Canal st. Secy.     83"

Source:  UNITED BROTHERS' LAND SOCIEty and PROSPECT HILL VILLAGE AssociationThe Sun [NY, NY], Aug. 4, 1851, No. 5551, p. 3, col. 1.  

"PELHAMVILLE LOTS AT AUCTION -- BY Order of the United Brothers Land Society, the surplus lots marked on map from A to Y inclusive will be sold on the ground at Pelhamville, on Monday next, the 15th inst., at 1 o'clock, by public auction to the highest bidder.  Also, one old building, and all the cut wood belonging to the Society.  Twenty per cent. to be paid on lots when sold, and the balance on delivery of the deeds, the building and wood to be paid for in full at the time of sale.  H. MARSDEN, Trustee.  The New Haven cars leave Canal st at half past 11 o'clk a.m.     s11 41s*112"

Source:  PELHAMVILLE LOTS AT AUCTION, The Sun [NY, NY], Sep. 11, 1851, No. 5584, p. 3, col. 6.  See also PELHAMVILLE LOTS AT AUCTION, The New York Herald, Sep. 11, 1851, p. 3, col. 5.  

"PELHAMVILLE LOTS at AUCTION. -- By order of the United Brothers' Land Society, the SURPLUS LOTS marked on map, from A to Y, inclusive, will be sold on the ground, at Pelhamville, on MONDAY next, the 15th inst., at 1 o'clock, by public auction, to the highest bidder.  Also, one old Building, and all the cut Wood belonging to the Society.  Twenty per cent. to be paid on Lots when sold, and the balance on delivery of deeds; the Building and Wood to be paid for in full at the time of sale.  H. MARSDEN, Trustee.

The New-Haven Cars leave Canal-st. at 11 1/2 o'clock.
s11 4t*"

Source:  PELHAMVILLE LOTS at AUCTION, New-York Daily Tribune, Sep. 12, 1851, Vol. XI, No. 3246, p. 9, col. 6.  See also id. at p. 1, col 6.  

"PELHAMVILLE LOTS AT AUCTION -- BY Order of the United Brothers Land Society, the surplus lots marked on map from A to Y inclusive will be sold on the ground at Pelhamville, on Monday next, the 15th inst., at 1 o'clock, by public auction to the highest bidder.  Also, one old building, and all the cut wood belonging to the Society.  Twenty per cent. to be paid on lots when sold, and the balance on delivery of the deeds, the building and wood to be paid for in full at the time of sale.  H. MARSDEN, Trustee.  The New Haven cars leave Canal st at half past 11 o'clk a.m.     s1141s*112"

Source:  PELHAMVILLE LOTS AT AUCTION,  The Sun [NY, NY], Sep. 13, 1851, No. 5586, p. 3, col. 5.

"PELHAMVILLE LOTS AT AUCTION. -- BY ORDER OF the United Brothers' Land Society, the surplus lots marked on map from A to Y inclusive, will be sold on the ground at Pelhamville, on Monday next, the 15th instant at one o'clock, by public auction, to the highest bidder.  Also one old Building and all the Cut Wood belonging to the Society.  Twenty per cent to be paid on lots when sold, and the balance on delivery of the deeds.  The building and wood to be paid for in full at the time of sale.

H. MARSDEN, Trustee.

The New Haven cars leave Canal street at half-past eleven o'clock, A. M."

Source:  PELHAMVILLE LOTS AT AUCTION [Advertisement], New York Herald, Sep. 15, 1851, p. 3, col. 4.

"THE PROSPECT HILL VILLAGE ASsociation meet on Monday evening, Aug. [illegible], at 8 o'clock, at American Hall, corner of Broadway and Grand st.  A few more members will be admitted.  For further information and constitution apply to ALFRED S. PEACE, Prest. 161 3d st. (or of W. PARKER Secy., 192 Canal st.      66 . . . .

PELHAMVILLE LOTS AT AUCTION -- BY Order of the United Brothers Land Society, the surplus lots marked on map from A to Y inclusive will be sold on the ground at Pelhamville, on Monday next, the 15th inst., at 1 o'clock, by public auction to the highest bidder.  Also, one old building, and all the cut wood belonging to the Society.  Twenty per cent. to be paid on lots when sold, and the balance on delivery of the deeds, the building and wood to be paid for in full at the time of sale.  H. MARSDEN, Trustee.  The New Haven cars leave Canal st. at half-past 11 o'clk a.m.     s11 41sb112"

Source:  THE PROSPECT HILL VILLAGE and PELHAMVILLE LOTS AT AUCTION, The Sun [NY, NY], Sep. 15, 1851, No. 5587, p. 3, cols. 1 & 6.

"UNITED BROTHERS LAND SOCIEty.  The members are requested to attend a public meeting of the Society, at Convention Hall, No. 175 Wooster st. between Houston and Bleecker sts. on Monday, Oct. 13th, at 8 o'clock P.M., to hear the report of the executive committee, and transact general business, preparatory to an early close of the society.  CHARLES WILKIE, Chairman.     c1931s* 133"

Source:  UNITED BROTHERS LAND SOCIEty, The Sun [NY, NY], Oct. 10, 1851, No. 6008, p. 3, col. 1.  

"UNITED BROTHERS LAND SOCIETY. -- THE MEMbers are requested to attend a public meeting of the society at Convention Hall, No. 175 Wooster street, between Houston and Bleecker streets, on Monday, October 13, at 8 o'clock, P. M., to hear the report of the Executive Committee, and transact general business preparatory to an early close of the society.  

CHARLES WILKIE,
Chairman of the Executive Committee."

Source:  UNITED BROTHERS LAND SOCIETY [Advertisement], New York Herald, Oct. 11, 1851, p. 5, col. 5.  

"UNITED BROTHERS' LAND SOCIEty.  The members are requested to attend a public meeting of the Society, at Convention Hall, No. 175 Wooster st., between Houston and Bleecker sts., on Monday, Oct. 13th, at 8 o'clock P.M., to hear the report of the executive committee, and transact general business, preparatory to an early close of the society.  CHARLES WILKIE, Chairman. . . ."

Source:  UNITED BROTHERS' LAND SOCIEty, The Sun [NY. NY], Oct. 13, 1851, No. 6010, p. 3, col. 1.   

"United Brothers Land Society. -- The Members who have not delivered to Messrs. Barnard & Parsons, Attorneys, No. 16 Wall st., the certificate for their lot at Pelhamville, are requested to do so immediately, or they may have to wait twelve months for their deed.  Those who left their certificate previous to October 23 can have their deed by applying as above.

H. MARSDEN, Trustee.
j13 utTuTh&S*"

Source:  United Brothers Land Society [Advertisement], New-York Daily Tribune, Jan. 13, 1852, p. 1, col. 2.

"UNITED BROTHERS' LAND SOCIETY. -- BY ORDER of the Society, the south half of lot No. 128, in Pelhamville, is to be sold.  Persons wishing to buy will please send in their bids, with names and residences, in writing, to Henry Marsden, No. 40 Thompson street, before Monday evening, April 26th, in order that the Executive Committee may award it to the highest bidder.  Terms cash, on delivery of the deed."

Source:  UNITED BROTHERS' LAND SOCIETY [Advertisement], New York Herald, Apr. 21, 1852, p. 4, col. 5.  See also UNITED BROTHERS' LAND SOCIETY [Advertisement], New York Herald, Apr. 24, 1852, p. 5, col. 6 (same); UNITED BROTHERS' LAND SOCIETY [Advertisement], New-York Daily Tribune, Apr. 24, 1852 p. 3, col. 2 (same).


Home Page of the Historic Pelham Blog.

Labels: , , , , , , , , , , ,

0 Comments:

Post a Comment

<< Home