Historic Pelham

Presenting the rich history of Pelham, NY in Westchester County: current historical research, descriptions of how to research Pelham history online and genealogy discussions of Pelham families.

Friday, May 25, 2018

Pelham Manor Cracked Down on Proliferation of Miniature Golf and Golf Driving Ranges in the Early 1930s


During the late 1920s and early 1930s, the nation's interest in golf was at a fever pitch.  Pelham was no exception.  

One manifestation of golf fever was the proliferation of so-called "midget golf courses."  These are courses we think of today as "short courses," akin to a smaller "par 3 course."  Another type of course that swept the nation was a "Tom Thumb course," otherwise known as a "putt putt course" -- what we think of today as a true "miniature golf course."  Indeed, I have written before of two such Tom Thumb courses that opened in 1930 in the Village of North Pelham.  See Tue., Dec. 09, 2014:  The Miniature Golf Craze Hits Pelham in 1930 as Two "Tom Thumb" Golf Courses Open.  

During this nationwide golf craze, driving ranges and a short course opened in the Village of Pelham Manor as well.  Today's Historic Pelham Blog article tells the story of those Pelham Manor driving ranges and short course. 

The Pelham Driving Range

By either late 1929 or early 1930, a man named Thomas Alton opened an extensive golf driving range along Boston Post Road in the Village of Pelham Manor near the Hutchinson River Parkway.  Alton named the facility "Pelham Golf Range."  It also was referenced as the "Pelham Driving Range" and the "Boston Post Driving Range."  



1932 Advertisement for the "Pelham Golf Range."  Source:
PELHAM GOLF RANGE, The Pelham Sun, Jun. 3, 1932,
p. 11, col. 8.  NOTE:  Click on Image to Enlarge.

As the advertisement above notes, when the range opened lessons were available and a pail of golf balls cost 35 cents.  The facility also advertised itself as "THE FINEST RANGE IN WESTCHESTER" (see advertisement immediately below).  


1931 Advertisement for the "Pelham Golf Driving Range."  Source:
[Mount Vernon, NY], Mar. 20, 1931, p. 22, cols 3-4.  NOTE:  Click
on Image to Enlarge.

The Pelham Golf Driving Range gained some notoriety when, on Sunday, May 10, 1931, a terrible electrical storm swept over Pelham.  As the lightning began, three employees of the facility began running for cover toward a small shed on the range.  As they ran, a massive lightning bolt struck near them, knocking all three unconscious.  Others nearby phoned the police.  

Motorcycle patrolman Thomas Fagan arrived and found James McFarland, 22, William Dorasch, 18, and Thomas Alton, 33 unconscious.  He applied first aid and brought two of the men back to consciousness.  An ambulance arrived and took the three men to New Rochelle Hospital where two were promptly released and the third was held for observation though he also recovered.

The Pelham Golf Driving Range had a constant problem with trespassers who would sneak onto the range at night and steal golf balls.  Finally the owner, Tom Alton, seemed to follow a zero tolerance policy and prosecuted all who were caught -- even when they were caught with as few as three golf balls.  Culprits were dragged into the Pelham Manor police court repeatedly -- and usually were residents of New York City, New Rochelle, and Mount Vernon.

By at least 1936 if not before, ownership of the driving range had changed.  Arthur Milton became the owner and the facility was renamed "Milton's Driving Range."  It became a location where members of the Pelham Memorial High School Driving Club practiced.

Although research has not yet revealed when the facility closed, it continued to operate as late as 1941.

The Pelham Manor Junior Golf Course

A man named Jules Kibel (also misspelled "Kibble") opened a golf short course on September 27, 1930 named the "Pelham Manor Junior Golf Course."  Although a number of newspaper references to its location were imprecise (and even erroneous), it was located southeast of the intersection of Boston Post Road and Pelhamdale Avenue in part of an area between today's Boston Post Road and Wynnewood Avenue once owned by Arthur W. Cole (through Colco Inc.).  The map detail immediately below shows the rough location of the short course and driving range.



Detail from 1929 Map With Arrow Indicating Approximate Location
of the Pelham Manor Junior Golf Course and Driving Range on Land
of Arthur Cole (Owned Through Colco Inc.).  Source:  G. M. Hopkins
Co., Atlas of Westchester County, Vol. 1, Pg. 2 (Philadelphia, PA:
G. M. Hopkins Co., 1929).  NOTE:  Click on Image to Enlarge.

At first the short course offered mere golf experience for those interested in playing short clubs on a small course chock full of hazards.  In early July, 1931, however, Jules Kibel announced the opening of a new driving range "installed alongside of the attractive fairways of the miniature golf course."  Thus, the facility offered "not only the popular approach game" on its short fairways, but also the opportunity to practice long drives on a range that even offered distance targets as "an opportunity for those who like to smack them out for great distances."  

The Pelham Manor Junior Golf Course on the Boston road east of Pelhamdale avenue is now equipped to suit all the requirements of the golfing enthusiast who likes his game to be centered in a small space.  A new driving range has been installed alongside of the attractive fairways of the miniature golf course.  Here not only the popular approach game can be played but there is also an opportunity for those who like to smack them out for great distances."

The new driving range at Pelhamdale Avenue and Boston Post Road charged fifty cents per bucket of balls.  It cost twenty-five cents for adults and fifteen cents for children to play a round of golf on the adjoining short course.  According to one advertisement, a competition was held each Wednesday night for a $5 prize and free automobile parking adjoining the driving range.  

Some in Pelham Manor welcomed the "midget golf course" as it often was called.  Before construction of the course, there stood on a portion of the property an "unsightly pile of bricks" that had been there "for several years."  According to one account, the course was "beautifully landscaped, shrubs have been planted and an ingenious brook winds its way across the fairways which offer many hazards."  Interestingly, the short fairways were not of grass.  They were a mixture of "sand, clay and green slate granules" which required grooming, but not the sort of grounds keeping maintenance of an ordinary golf course.  According to an advertisement when the short course opened in 1930:

"Over 24,000 square feet of the finest playing greens and fairways that can be found anywhere makes playing the popular miniature golf here the most pleasant and healthful sport of all!  The course is three times as large as the average and offers natural water and tree hazards and sand traps that are found only on the best of full-sized golf courses.  You'll need mashie-niblicks here as well as putters -- we supply them with the balls."

Efforts by Pelham Manor to Limit the Spread of Such Golf Facilities

Others in Pelham Manor were outraged at the opening of the new "midget course" known as the Pelham Manor Junior Golf Course.  First, they were offended that the facility opened at what then was considered the very heart of Pelham Manor:  Four Corners.  Second, they were fearful that with two relatively new golf facilities along Boston Post Road within a few hundred yards of each other, Pelham Manor soon would be "dotted" with such miniature courses.  

Indeed, there were substantial objections to the short course at Four Corners nearly from the beginning.  The day before the course opened and on the same day that a full page advertisement for the small course appeared in the local newspaper, the front page of the same newspaper (The Pelham Sun) reported on the status of a proposed zoning ordinance to ban driving ranges, miniature golf courses, and so-called "Tom Thumb" golf courses (so-called putt-putt courses or true miniature golf facilities.  The newspaper reported:

"Determined that the Village of Pelham Manor will not be dotted with miniature golf courses, the Board of Trustees has enacted an ordinance preventing the construction of any new golf course or golf range, conducted for profit, outside of the industrial district.  The miniature golf course which will be opened on the Boston road east of Pelhamdale avenue will not be ousted as the ordinance will not be effective until after a public hearing is held on October 6.  Mayor Lawrence F. Sherman told The Pelham Sun that the village could not block the opening of this course as no buildings are to be constructed thereon.  A permit for a caddy house was denied by the building department.  In the meantime a storm of protest has been heard from residents of the Boston road district.  Their contention is that the zoning ordinance bars any business except as an integral part of an apartment house.  Threats of suit to force the trustees to halt the construction of the course has been heard.  At the public hearing the trustees will be required to explain why the existing zone ordinance does not already prevent the construction of such courses as described in the amendment."

A few months later, on May 13, 1931, the Pelham Manor Zoning Board followed the building department's lead and denied a permit for the Pelham Manor Junior Golf Course to build the "caddy house" it sought on the course.

There were other issues associated with the small golf facilities.  For example, police repeatedly had to respond to incidents of young people trespassing at the facilities as well as large thefts of range golf balls (as many as 3,000 in one instance).  

Despite such concerns, the Pelham Golf Driving Range and the Pelham Manor Junior Golf Facility with its driving range were popular recreation destinations for a number of years.

The proposed zoning ordinance banning such facilities passed.  Pelham Manor, it would seem, would be spared the horror of proliferating golf facilities.


Full Page Advertisement Announcing the Opening of the Pelham
Manor Junior Golf Course on September 27, 1930.  Source:  "THE
The Pelham Sun, Sep. 26, 1930, Vol. 21, No. 26, p. 5 (Full-Page Ad).
NOTE:  Text Transcribed Immediately Below; Click on Image to Enlarge.

"'The greens are marvelous -- so accurate and even!'

'The fairways are of sand, clay and green slate granules!'

'THE PELHAM MANOR JUNIOR GOLF COURSE' OPENS TOMORROW SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 27th

You and your friends are cordially invited to inspect Westchester County's most Beautiful and Scientific Miniature Golf Course.

Over 24,000 square feet of the finest playing greens and fairways that can be found anywhere makes playing the popular miniature golf here the most pleasant and healthful sport of all!  The course is three times as large as the average and offers natural water and tree hazards and sand traps that are found only on the best of full-sized golf courses.  You'll need mashie-niblicks here as well as putters -- we supply them with the balls.

PELHAM MANOR JUNIOR GOLF COURSE
North of Pelhamdale Avenue on the Boston Post Road Next to Manor Gas Station

CHILDREN -- 25 cents
ADULTS -- 35 cents
Until Six P. M.

ADULTS -- 50 cents Evenings, Saturday, Sunday and Holidays

FREE PARKING IN OUR WELL LIGHTED PARKING SECTION WHICH ADJOINS THE COURSE"



July 2, 1931 Advertisement Announcing Addition of a Driving Range at
the Pelham Manor Junior Golf Course at Pelhamdale Avenue and Boston
Post Road.  Source:  NEW SPORT AT JUNIOR COURSE IN PELHAM
Golf CourseThe Pelham Sun, Jul. 2, 1931, Vol. 22, No. 14, p. 11, col. 6.
NOTE:  Click on Image to Enlarge.



1930 Advertisement for the Pelham Manor Junior Golf Course.
MANOR JUNIOR GOLF COURSE, The Pelham Sun, Oct. 3, 1930,
Vol. 21, No. 27, p. 2, cols. 5-8.  NOTE:  Click on Image to Enlarge;
Transcription of Text Appears Immediately Below.


"There is a TOUCH OF REFINEMENT About the PELHAM MANOR JUNIOR GOLF COURSE That attracts Refined People

Over 24,000 square feet of the finest playing greens and fairways that can be found anywhere makes playing the popular miniature golf here the most pleasant and healthful sport of all!  The course is three times as large as the average and offers natural water and tree hazards and sand traps that are found only on the best of full sized golf courses.  You'll need mashie-niblicks here as well as putters -- we supply them with the balls.

PELHAM MANOR JUNIOR GOLF COURSE

NORTH OF PELHAMDALE AVENUE ON THE BOSTON POST ROAD

FREE PARKING IN OUR WELL LIGHTED PARKING SECTION WHICH ADJOINS THE COURSE"

*          *          *          *           *

"PREVENT SPREAD OF MIDGET GOLF COURSES IN MANOR
-----
Public Hearing on Zoning Ordinance Amendment to Be Held Oct. 6.  Opposition Strong.
-----

Determined that the Village of Pelham Manor will not be dotted with miniature golf courses, the Board of Trustees has enacted an ordinance preventing the construction of any new golf course or golf range, conducted for profit, outside of the industrial district.  The miniature golf course which will be opened on the Boston road east of Pelhamdale avenue will not be ousted as the ordinance will not be effective until after a public hearing is held on October 6.

Mayor Lawrence F. Sherman told The Pelham Sun that the village could not block the opening of this course as no buildings are to be constructed thereon.  A permit for a caddy house was denied by the building department.

In the meantime a storm of protest has been heard from residents of the Boston road district.  Their contention is that the zoning ordinance bars any business except as an integral part of an apartment house.  Threats of suit to force the trustees to halt the construction of the course has been heard.  At the public hearing the trustees will be required to explain why the existing zone ordinance does not already prevent the construction of such courses as described in the amendment.

In the meantime Jules Kibel, proprietor of the Pelham Manor Junior Golf Course has installed a picturesque miniature course on the property adjacent to the old Red Church building.  The ground is owned by Arthur W. Cole.  The golf course has replaced the unsightly pile of bricks that occupied the property for several years.  Kibel has laid his course out in a manner different to the usual variety of midget courses.

The course is beautifully landscaped, shrubs have been planted and an ingenious brook winds its way across the fairways which offer many hazards.

The new course will open to the public tomorrow afternoon."

Source:  PREVENT SPREAD OF MIDGET GOLF COURSES IN MANOR -- Public Hearing on Zoning Ordinance Amendment to Be Held Oct. 6.  Opposition Strong, The Pelham Sun, Sep. 26, 1930, Vol. 21, No. 26, p. 1, col. 6.  

"TRESPASS ON GOLF RANGE; FINED $2
-----

Four youths were fined $2 each on charges of trespassing brought by Thomas Alton, of No. 637 James street, Pelham Manor, owner of the Pelham Driving Range.  In Pelham Manor court last night Alton said that the youths had been very sarcastic when he had asked them to get off the range, which is located on the Boston Post road near the Hutchinson River parkway.

The youths were:  Charles Garetta, 21, of No. 109 South 12th avenue; Vincent Fagano, 22, of No. 211 South 12th avenue; Anthony Tusillo, 20, of No. 216 South 6th avenue; all of Mount Vernon; and John Sacco, 19, of No. 45 Seton avenue, Bronx.

The quartette was arrested by Patrolman Thomas Fagan on Tuesday night while they were crossing the Secor Lane dumping ground after leaving the golf range.  At that time they told the policeman that they were looking for rats.

The youths told Judge John C. Townsend last night that they had left after Alton had directed them to go.  They had no golf balls on their persons when arrested."

Source:  TRESPASS ON GOLF RANGE; FINED $2, The Pelham Sun, Sep. 26, 1930, Vol. 21, No. 26, p. 4, col. 3.  

"STEAL 639 BALLS, PAY TWO $25 FINES
-----

Fines of $25 were imposed on Anthony Cassino, twenty, and Nicholas Larusso, seventeen, of New Rochelle by Judge Floyd Price in Pelham Manor Court last night.  The youths pleaded guilty to a charge of stealing golf balls from the Pelham Driving Range at Hutchinson Parkway and the Boston Post Road yesterday morning.  

Sergeant Michael Grady of the Pelham Manor Police saw the boys collecting the balls, waited until they had filled a burlap bag, and then arrested them as they left the range. 

They had labored from sunrise to 7 o'clock in gathering 639 balls from the grounds, they said."

Source:  STEAL 639 BALLS, PAY TWO $25 FINES, The Daily Argus [Mount Vernon, NY], Nov. 21, 1930, p. 22, col. 5.  

"MIDGET GOLFERS READY FOR TINY TOURNAMENTS
-----
Driving Range and Miniature Golf Courses Will Soon Be in Shape For Enthusiasts.
-----

With the activity around local pint-sized golf courses, it is easy to imagine that in the spring a young man's fancy turns to light forms of golf.  The knights of the driving range and putting courses are eager to be back of their less tiring games and there is every indication that the season will soon be at the same height that it ws ere the chilly winds put an end to activities last fall.

Over in Pelham Manor the Boston Post Road Driving Range has gotten its game under way early, and hooks and slices have been mixing in with long drives for the last two weeks.  For those to whom golf means simply a bucket of balls and a driver the range is proving most attractive.

But for those who take their game seriously and meticulously tap a pellet around a course clogged with rabbit hutches, hollow logs and over teaspoon water hazards, the Tom Thumb links will soon be ready.  Joe Carraher who presides over the North Pelham Tom Thumb Course on Fourth street, hopes to get his links in shape for opening tomorrow.  Angelo Da Quisto and Vincent Smith who fought it out for the local championship last year are eager to get into the game again; so cries of 'fore,' and sometimes five and six will soon be heard on the midget course.

The Pelham Manor Junior Country Club on the Boston Road will also be in shape within a few days."

Source:  MIDGET GOLFERS READY FOR TINY TOURNAMENTS -- Driving Range and Miniature Golf Courses Will Soon Be in Shape For Enthusiasts, The Pelham Sun, Apr. 24, 1931, p. 11, col. 2.  

"3 MEN RENDERED UNCONSCIOUS BY LIGHTNING BOLT
-----
Sudden Storm Did Damage in Pelham on Sunday Night; Peculiar Accident at Golf Range.
-----

Three men, employees of the Pelham Golf Driving Range at Hutchinson River Parkway and Boston Post Road, Pelham Manor, were rendered unconscious Sunday night during the severe electrical storm when a bolt of lightning struck the range near them.

The trio, James McFarland, 22, of No. 416 Bedford Avenue, and William Dorasch, 18, of No. 259 South Third avenue, both of Mount Vernon, and Thomas Alton, 33, of 3565 Ropes avenue, New York City, were rushed to New Rochelle Hospital in an ambulance.

Motorcycle Officer Thomas Fagan who was detailed to the scene following a telephone call to headquarters that three men had been struck by lightning, found the men lying unconscious in the mud a short distance from a shed on the range.

Officer Fagan, immediately upon discovering the three bodies, applied first aid methods and brought two of the trio back to consciousness before the arrival of the ambulance.

At the hospital, all three were treated for shock and Alton held for observation.  Hospital officials desired to hold McFarland for observation but he refused to stay and was allowed to go home.

The men said that they had been working on the range and had headed for the shed for shelter when the storm broke.  They had almost reached the building when the lightning struck near them and they were rendered unconscious.

Damage by the storm in Pelham was slight with the exception of a large number of branches of trees that were blown down.  The streets of all three villages were littered with leaves.  

Homes in North Pelham were plunged into darkness shortly after 8:30 o'clock when the storm damaged lighting wires in that village.  Police notified the Westchester Lighting Company that all lights between First and Sixth Streets on First, Second and Third avenues were out.  Emergency crews got to work as soon as possible and repaired the damage so that service was resumed shortly after midnight.

In Pelham Heights, a large tree on First street was struck by lightning and one section of the trunk split and the bark peeled off."

Source:  3 MEN RENDERED UNCONSCIOUS BY LIGHTNING BOLT -- Sudden Storm Did Damage in Pelham on Sunday Night; Peculiar Accident at Golf Range, The Pelham Sun, May 15, 1931, Vol. 22, No. 7, p. 1, col. 6.

"Permit Denied
-----

The Pelham Manor Zoning Board of Appeals on Wednesday night reviewed the application of the Pelham Manor Junior Golf Course for a permit to construct a caddy house at the course which is located on the Boston road east of Pelhamdale avenue.  The permit was denied."

Source:  Permit Denied, The Pelham Sun, May 15, 1931, Vol. 22, No. 7, p. 1, col. 1.

"NEW SPORT AT JUNIOR COURSE IN PELHAM MANOR
-----
Driving Range Added to Sports Facilities of Attractive Miniature Golf Course.
-----

The Pelham Manor Junior Golf Course on the Boston road east of Pelhamdale avenue is now equipped to suit all the requirements of the golfing enthusiast who likes his game to be centered in a small space.  A new driving range has been installed alongside of the attractive fairways of the miniature golf course.  Here not only the popular approach game can be played but there is also an opportunity for those who like to smack them out for great distances.

Targets have been arranged for those who are able to regulate their direction accurately.

Jules Kibble is proprietor of the Pelham Manor Junior Golf Course."

Source:  NEW SPORT AT JUNIOR COURSE IN PELHAM MANOR -- Driving Range Added to Sports Facilities of Attractive Miniature Golf Course, The Pelham Sun, Jul. 2, 1931, Vol. 22, No. 14, p. 11, col. 6.

"PELHAM MANOR
CHARGE DISMISSED

A petty larceny charge against Ernest Garcian of Manchester, N. H., was dismissed by Judge Floyd Price in Pelham Manor Court last night.  Garcian had been picked up on the Boston Road by Sergeant Grady and Patrolman Smith.  He admitted having been on the property of the Pelham Driving Range, the manager of which appeared last night to press the charge of larceny of three golf balls."

Source:  PELHAM MANOR -- CHARGE DISMISSED, The Daily Argus [Mount Vernon, NY], Jul. 30, 1931, p. 14, col. 4.  

"BOYS CHARGED WITH GOLF BALL THEFT
-----

Four young New Rochelle boys were taken into custody by Pelham Manor police on Wednesday afternoon on complaint of Tom Alton of the Pelham Driving Range on Boston Post road, that they had stolen golf balls from his range.

When arrested the boys had 33 golf balls.  They were turned over to Children's Court authorities."

Source:  BOYS CHARGED WITH GOLF BALL THEFT, The Pelham Sun, Aug. 28, 1931, Vol. 22, No. 22, p. 1, col. 5.  

"BOYS CHARGED WITH GOLF BALL THEFT
-----

Charged with the theft of 80 golf balls from the Pelham Driving Range on Boston Post road, Pelham Manor, Edward Olson, 17, of No. 4029 Hill avenue, and Oscar Larson, 18, 2108 Strang avenue, both of the Bronx, pleaded not guilty before Judge Frank Roberson in Manor court last night.  The court found them guilty of petit larceny and suspended sentence.

The boys were arrested by Mount Vernon police on Wednesday afternoon on complaint of Thomas Alton, proprietor of the driving range.  Alton charged that the boys had stolen the balls from his property.  They were taken to Pelham Manor and later released in bail of $25.00 each, pending trial."

Source:  BOYS CHARGED WITH GOLF BALL THEFT, The Pelham Sun, Nov. 11, 1932, p. 8, col. 7.  

"Fine For Blasting Without A Permit
-----

Carlo Petrillo, contractor, of No. 114 Primrose avenue, Mount Vernon, was fined $15.00 in Pelham Manor  police court Friday night when he was found guilty by Judge James Male on a charge of blasting without a permit.  

Petrillo, who was summoned by Arthur W. Fawcett, acting chief of the Manor Fire Department, was charged with blasting rock on the golf driving range at Boston Post Road and the Hutchinson River Parkway."

Source:  Fine For Blasting Without A Permit, The Pelham Sun, Apr. 6, 1934, p. 12, col. 2.

"Reports Theft of 3,000 Golf Balls
-----

Three thousand golf balls, valued at $85.00 and the property of the Pelham Manor Driving Range at Boston road and Hutchinson River Parkway, were reported stolen Wednesday morning by William Scanlon, owner of the establishment.  Pelham Manor police sent out an alarm notifying county police departments of the theft in case attempts were made to dispose of the balls.  The balls were contained in cloth bags and were 'seconds.'

Scanlon discovered the theft Wednesday morning when he opened the frame building in which he stores his equipment.  Police investigated but were unable to find any trace of forced entry.  During the night the premises were inspected several times by policemen on their tours of duty, but everything was reported all right."

Source:  Reports Theft of 3,000 Golf Balls, The Pelham Sun, Apr. 20, 1934, Vol. 25, No. 5, p. 1, col. 6.  

"THEFT CHARGES ARE WITHDRAWN
-----
Driving Range Owner Drops Case Against Two Suspects
-----
(Special To The Daily Argus)

PELHAM MANOR, Aug. 26 -- Charges of petit larceny in connection with the theft of golf balls were withdrawn by the owner of the Pelham driving range in Village Court last night.

Louis De Caprio, twenty-eight, and Guisseppe Fuselli, twenty-one, both of New York City, were arrested Sunday on the complaint of Arthur Milton, owner of the range.  Milton told the Court he wished to withdraw the charges, but stipulated the men must keep away from Pelham.

'We are continually having golf balls stolen,' Mr. Milton said, 'but I don't want to press charges, because Caprio is trying for a Civil Service position.'

Fuselli received a suspended sentence for driving without a registration card."

Source:  THEFT CHARGES ARE WITHDRAWN -- Driving Range Owner Drops Case Against Two Suspects, The Daily Argus [Mount Vernon, NY], Aug. 26, 1936, p. 4, col. 5.  

"LEGAL NOTICE
-----
APRIL, 1938
PROPOSED ZONING ORDINANCE for the VILLAGE OF PELHAM MANOR New York
Prepared by RUDOLPH P. MILLER Consulting Engineer
New York, N. Y.
Revised by the ZONING COMMISSION of the Village of Pelham Manor after a public hearing on March 21, 1938. . . . 

Section 32 -- GENERAL RESTRICTIONS.

     1. -- New Buildings and Uses.  No building or structure shall hereafter be erected, and no existing building or structure shall hereafter be enlarged or otherwise structurally altered, to be used or occupied for any purpose other than a use permitted in the district in which the building or land is located.

     2. -- Existing Buildings and Uses.  (a)  The lawful use of a building heretofore erected, or of a building heretofore authorized by a building permit lawfully issued and the construction of which, at the time this ordinance became effective, was actually begun and diligently prosecuted, may be continued, although such use does not conform with the provisions of this ordinance.

     (b)  No non-conforming use shall be extended so as to displace a conforming residential use.

     3. -- Non-Conforming Use. (a) The lawful use of any land existing at the time of this ordinance is adopted may be continued, although such use does not conform with the provisions of this ordinance.

     (b)  Whenever a non-conforming use of a building or of any land has been discontinued such building or land shall not be used or occupied for any purpose other than a use permitted in the district in which the building or land is located.  A change of ownership or tenancy shall not be deemed a discontinuance of use, provided the occupancy is not changed to a use of different classification.

     4. -- Prohibitions.  Except as hereinafter specifically provided, the following prohibitions shall apply throughout the Village of Pelham Manor: . . . .

     (e) No building or structure shall be hereafter erected or altered, nor shall any land be used as an amusement park or motordrome, or as a driving range, Tom Thumb course, miniature golf course, or golf course of any kind, if in any case it is to be conducted or operated for hire or profit. . . ."

Source:  LEGAL NOTICE ----- APRIL, 1938 PROPOSED ZONING ORDINANCE for the VILLAGE OF PELHAM MANOR New York, The Pelham Sun, Apr. 22, 1938, p. 11, cols. 1-8 & p. 12, cols. 1-8.  

"GOLF GROUP PRACTICES ON DRIVING RANGE
-----

Pelham High School golf group held its first practice driving session on Monday afternoon at Milton's Driving Range, Boston Post road, Pelham Manor.

The club is composed of ten boys interested in learning the finer points of golf.  It is sponsored by Carl Schilling every Monday afternoon.  The club includes:  Victor Armell, Edward Casanave, George Gow, Charles Lang, Jack Newitz, Robert Riesner, Frank Ward, Dave Hayman, Charles Schrotter and Robert Moberg."

Source:  GOLF GROUP PRACTICES ON DRIVING RANGE, The Pelham Sun, May 2, 1941, Vol. 31, No. 4, p. 3, col. 5.

Archive of the Historic Pelham Web Site.
Home Page of the Historic Pelham Blog.

Order a Copy of "Thomas Pell and the Legend of the Pell Treaty Oak."

Labels: , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Wednesday, May 23, 2018

Announcement of Planned Extension of the Hutchinson River Parkway in 1940


By 1940, there no longer was any pretense that the roadway was a lovely "parkway."  No, by 1940, the Hutchinson River Parkway was considered a potential "super-highway" that needed a major extension to permit New Yorkers to avoid congested streets and boulevards for outings in Westchester County, Connecticut, and Southern New England.  In barely a decade, the nature of the roadway was transformed from its original conception as a lovely "parkway" for Sunday afternoon jaunts into a major automobile artery connecting New York City with southern New England.  Thank you, Robert Moses.  Pelham, of course, was in the cross-hairs.

The history of the Hutchinson River Parkway, of course, is integrally intertwined with the history of the Town of Pelham during the 20th and 21st centuries.  Consequently, I have wriitten about the Hutchinson River Parkway on numerous occasions.  See, e.g.:

Wed., Mar. 07, 2018:  Pelhamites Learned of a Planned "Hutchinson River Improvement" in 1922.

Fri., Nov. 24, 2017:  Hutchinson River Parkway Detritus Was Used to Fill Much of the Pelham Reservoir in 1925.

Mon., May 08, 2017:  Pelham's Historic East Third Street Bridge Over the Hutchinson River Parkway.

Wed., Feb. 01, 2017:  Pelham Historic Marker Placed on Hutchinson River Parkway in 1927.

Tuesday, May 10, 2016:  A History of Tolls on the Hutchinson River Parkway and Their Impact on Pelham.

Tue., Aug. 26, 2014:  Westchester County Board of Supervisors Decided To Extend the Hutchinson River Parkway Through Pelham in 1923.

In 1940, newspapers in the region were filled with news accounts of plans to extend the "parkway" from the Eastern Boulevard, south of Pelham, to the Bronx-Whitestone Bridge using a six-lane extension with no roads crossing the new super-highway.  The plans, of course, had been years in the making.

Only two years before, another extension of the Hutchinson River Parkway had been completed that extended the roadway from Boston Post Road in Pelham to the Eastern Boulevard (once known as the old Shore Road and the Pelham Bridge Road).  Additionally, in 1938 and 1939, New York authorities acquired the right-of-way required to extend the roadway all the way to the Bronx-Whitestone Bridge.

During that two-year period at the end of the 1930s, buildings along the newly-acquired sections of right-of-way were demolished, test borings were made, and bridge designs were drawn so that work on the planned extension could begin as soon as financing was in place.

The planned extension to the bridge was planned to cost about $8,000,000 to construct.  The money was raised through a "refinancing in which the New York City Parkway Authority was merged with the Triborough Bridge Authority, retaining the name of the latter.  Commissioner of Parks Robert Moses headed the parkway authority and he and Commissioners George V. McLaughlin and Roderick Stephens head the Triborough Bridge Authority."

In mid-May, 1940 the Triborough Bridge Authority announced that "contracts had been let for the substructure and superstructure of the Eastchester Creek bridge, for the Givans Creek bridge . . . and for considerable grading."  It further announced that "Bids on other contracts will be taken in the next few months."

Work began soon thereafter.  Pelham, it seemed, would never be the same.


"This map shows the Hutchinson River Parkway Extension in the Bronx.
The numbers at different points are explained in the caption below the
adjoining pictures, which show sections of the same district."  Source:
of Hutchinson River RoadN.Y. Sun, May 18, 1940, p. 5, cols. 2-4.
NOTE:  Click on Image to Enlarge.


"The Hutchinson River Parkway Extension (indicated by heavy white lines
in the above pictures) will relieve traffic congestion on Eastern Boulevard
(5), the Bronx, which at present is a link for motor vehicles moving between
Long Island and New England points, via the Bronx-Whitestone Bridge and
the Hutchinson River Parkway, Westchester county, and the Merritt Parkway,
Connecticut.  The picture at the bottom (looking north) shows the location (1),
of intersection and grade separations on the parkway extension at East
177th street at Eastern Boulevard.  In the picture at the top (looking north) is
another section of the parkway extension.  The Pelham Bay Parkway (2),
Gun Hill Road and Baychester avenue bridges and grade separations (3)
and the Eastchester Creek Bridge (4) are indicated as well as Eastern
1940, p. 5, cols. 2-4.  NOTE:  Click on Image to Enlarge.


*          *          *          *          *

"Another Parkway for the City
-----
Boon in Store for Motorists in the Extension of Hutchinson River Road.
-----

Contractors' steam shovels and graders soon will be making the dirt fly along Eastchester Creek in the Bronx, building an important new link in the ever-growing chain of parkways in the metropolitan area, as modern as the 1940 automobile and as safe from the hazards and delays of big-city traffic as engineering can make it.

Called the Hutchinson River Parkway Extension, the new super-highway will be a boon to motorists who, groaning at the perils and tribulations of the road, have spent many of their summer Sunday hours crawling along congested streets and boulevards for a short outing in upper Westchester county, Connecticut or southern New England.

The extension will strike south across Eastchester Creek from a point in the present Hutchinson River Parkway in Pelham Bay Park to the present approach to the Bronx-Whitestone Bridge.  No other roads will cross its six lanes of traffic, three northbound and three southbound and no red lights will bring automobiles screeching to a stop anywhere along its three and three-quarters miles of roadway.  Landscaped areas on either side and a mall between the north and south-bound lanes will make it a true parkway, as pleasing to the eye as it will be easy to the wheel.

Fast Route to Connecticut.

Long Island motorists, traveling along the existing parkways in Brooklyn and Queens and along the soon-to-be-completed Belt Parkway to the Bronx-Whitestone Bridge, will have a fast, direct route into Connecticut by way of the Merritt Parkway or into the north and south-bound Westchester county parkways by way of the Cross County Parkway or the Mosholu and Bronx Pelham parkways.

To be constructed on a right-of-way obtained in 1938 and 1939, the extension will be built by the Triborough Bridge Authority at a cost of around $8,000,000 and probably will be completed in eighteen months or so.  The new construction was made possible through the recent refinancing in which the New York City Parkway Authority was merged with the Triborough Bridge Authority, retaining the name of the latter.  Commissioner of Parks Robert Moses headed the parkway authority and he and Commissioners George V. McLaughlin and Roderick Stephens head the Triborough Bridge Authority.

The new extension will branch off from the two-year-old section of the Hutchinson River Parkway running south from the Boston Post Road to Eastern Boulevard, which also is known as the old Shore Road and the Pelham Bridge Road.  The branch will be roughly a mile south of the Hutchinson River Parkway-Boston Post Road crossing and about 2,300 feet west of the intersection of the parkway and Eastern Boulevard.  An elaborate cloverleaf at the branch will enable motorists using the new extension to swing eastward to Orchard Beach and City Island, thus diverting some of the heavy summer traffic to those three resorts from the Eastern Boulevard, now badly congested.

A Bottle-neck to Go.

A new bridge with a bascule type opening for boats will carry the extension southward across Eastchester Creek several thousand feet to the west of the present Eastern Boulevard bridge, which constitutes a bad bottle-neck for motorists.  Another bridge will arch over Givans Creek and grade crossing separations will eliminate hazards at Baychester avenue, Gun Hill Road, the Bronx Pelham Parkway, Westchester avenue, Tremont avenue, Grass avenue and Eastern Boulevard at the beginning of the Bronx-Whitestone Bridge approach.  In addition there will be a grade crossing elimination where the New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad swings across the extension right-of-way between the Pelham Parkway and Gun Hill Road.

Buildings along the right-of-way have been demolished, test borings made and bridge designs drawn, so the actual work is expected to get under way rapidly.  The Triborough Bridge Authority announced last week end that contracts had been let for the substructure and superstructure of the Eastchester Creek bridge, for the Givans Creek bridge . . . and for considerable grading.  Bids on other contracts will be taken in the next few months."

Source:  Another Parkway for the City -- Boon in Store for Motorists in the Extension of Hutchinson River Road, N.Y. Sun, May 18, 1940, p. 5, cols. 2-4.

Archive of the Historic Pelham Web Site.
Home Page of the Historic Pelham Blog.

Order a Copy of "Thomas Pell and the Legend of the Pell Treaty Oak."

Labels: , , , , , , , , ,