Historic Pelham

Presenting the rich history of Pelham, NY in Westchester County: current historical research, descriptions of how to research Pelham history online and genealogy discussions of Pelham families.

Friday, November 08, 2019

More About Pelham Hose Company No. 2 of the Village of Pelham (Today's Pelham Heights)


Little study seems to have been made of the history of firefighting in Pelham Heights.  I have collected some information about the early years of Pelham Heights' Bravest and have written once before about their earliest years.  See Fri., Jun. 23, 2017:  A Little of the Early History of Hose Company No. 2, the Pelham Heights Volunteer Fire Fighting Unit.  

Pelham Heights was incorporated as the "Village of Pelham" in 1896.  It had no organized firefighting unit of its own until about 1912.  Until then, the Village relied on firefighters of the First Fire District of Pelham, the headquarters of which stood in the adjacent Village of North Pelham.  

In 1912, or perhaps shortly before, Pelham Heights residents formed an auxiliary company of volunteer firefighters associated with the First Fire District of Pelham.  The company was named Hose Company No. 2 of Pelham.  (Although some accounts indicate the company was formed in 1913, the company existed at the time of, and its members participated in, the 1912 Firemen's Inspection held on September 25, 1912.)  Dr. Augustine C. McGuire, a Cliff Avenue resident, was an important organizer of Hose Company No. 2.

Today's Historic Pelham article collects some additional information about the early years of Hose Company No. 2 of Pelham.  

Originally, according to one account, the Pelham Hose Company No. 2 "was formed as an auxiliary company, answering to all alarms in Pelham Heights and second alarms in North Pelham."  Shortly after creation of the Company, however, the "interest of the members" grew to such an extent that the Company began answering "all alarms."

As an "auxiliary company" at the time of its founding, the membership of the Company was limited to twenty firefighters.  By about 1922, however, the Company established itself as a "regular company" with expanded numbers.  Indeed, that year it requested the Board of Fire Commissioners to allow it to expand membership of the company from twenty to thirty men.  Thus, it engaged in a membership drive to "interest . . . the younger men of Pelham Heights."

For a number of years -- at least a decade if not more -- Pelham Hose Company No. 2 held monthly meetings in the homes of members.  In addition to the day-to-day risky business of fighting fires, an important part of the focus of the Company was to prepare for its annual inspection, an opportunity to demonstrate competence, training, and readiness to the community the Company served.  

In those early days of local volunteer fire fighting there was a constant theme of the need to improve the professionalism of Pelham's Bravest.  At one meeting held in the home of Harry Dotts on September 11, 1922, a local Fire Captain spoke with the members of the Company and "emphasized the necessity of reporting to fires in uniform, because of the danger involved for the individual member and the need for identification and prevention of improper persons passing inside the fire lines."  In response, the Company moved to authorize "the appointment of several special policemen for duty at time of fires, such duty to apply only to Pelham Heights." 

In those years, one of the most important events of the year for local firefighters and townspeople was the annual inspection of the First Fire District of the Town of Pelham.  Hose Company No. 2, of course, took part proudly in such inspections that usually were followed by parades, with marching bands, that proceeded through North Pelham and Pelham Heights.  A vivid description of one such parade following an annual fire inspection held in 1917 during World War I appears immediately below, followed by a citation and link to its source:

"Annual Inspection.

The annual inspection of the fire department of the first fire district of the town of Pelham was held last evening at 8 o'clock at Firemen's hall, Fifth avenue.  The inspecting party consisted of the fire commissioners, fire chiefs and representatives of the town and village governments.  Following the inspection a parade with about 150 in line was held through Pelham and North Pelham.  The firemen were headed by the subway band of New York, and were escorted thru the streets of North Pelham by a squad from the North Pelham Home Defense league of that village.  The firemen in other years were escorted by the village police.  There were three companies in line, the Liberty Engine company, the Relief Hook and  Ladder company and Hose company No. 2 of Pelham Heights, with a total of five pieces of apparatus including the automobile combination hose and pump apparatus of the Liberty Engine company, the old steamer, the old hose wagon, the hook and ladder and the new automobile apparatus of Hose company No. 2.  Refreshments were served at headquarters where a social time followed the parade."

Source:  Annual Inspection, The Daily Argus [Mount Vernon, NY], Sep. 29, 1917, No. 8483, p. 5, col. 1.  



Hand-Drawn Hose Cart of the Type Acquired by
Hose Company No. 2 of Pelham in About 1912.
NOTE:  Click on Image to Enlarge.

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The articles below, quoted in full, form part of the basis for today's Historic Pelham article.  The text of each is followed by a citation and link to its source.

"To Increase Membership Of Hose Company No. 2
-----

Hose Company No. 2 will endeavor to interest the younger men of Pelham Heights in the Fire Department, and in that end requested the Board of Fire Commissioners to allow the membership of the company to be increased from twenty members to thirty.  Gardner Hazen, secretary of the Pelham Heights company, appeared before the Board of Fire Commissioners Tuesday night and made the request.  The commissioners granted it.

Originally the Pelham Heights Company was formed as an auxiliary company, answering to all alarms in Pelham Heights and second alarms in North Pelham.  The interest of the members of this company has become such that the company answers all alarms.  Being an auxiliary company the membership was limited to twenty, but since the company has established itself as a regular company it was thought advisable to enlist the interest of the younger men of Pelham Heights."

Source:  To Increase Membership Of Hose Company No. 2, The Pelham Sun, Jun. 9, 1922, Vol. 13, No. 15, p. 6, col. 2.  

"Heights Hose Company Favors Fire Police
-----

Pelham Hose Co. No. 2 held its September meeting Monday, Sept. 11th, at the residence of Mr. Harry Dotts.  After a discussion of the approaching annual inspection, two new members were elected, Messrs. Clifford B. Howell and Wm. L. Bradley.

Capt. Ingalls in addressing the meeting emphasized the necessity of reporting to fires in uniform, because of the danger involved for the individual member and the need for identification and prevention of improper persons passing inside the fire lines.

A motion was made authorizing the appointment of several special policemen for duty at time of fires, such duty to apply only to Pelham Heights.

The membership committee took under consideration five names which will be voted upon at the next meeting.

Eleven of the company were present, Capt. Ingalls, Lieutenants Howe, Davis, Eliot, Hazin, Rich, Snyder, Specht, R. P. Young, Dotts, Baker.

GARDNER HAZEN,

Sec. Hose Co. No. 2."

Source:  Heights Hose Company Favors Fire Police, The Pelham Sun, Sep. 5, 1922, p. 7, col. 2.  

"Fire Board Sets February 24th As Date Of Election
-----
Seven Candidates For Six Positions Open On Fire Board of First Fire District

Indications point to a lively contest at the election of the new Board of Fire Commissioners for the First Fire District which will take place at the Town Hall on Saturday, Feb. 24, from 2 P. M. to 9 P. M.  Six candidates have been nominated for the five Commissionerships on the Board.

Pelham Heights Hose Co. nominate Commissioner Brundage for re-election and also placed in the field L. L. Willard.  Both nominations were indorsed [sic] by Relief Hook and Ladder Co. . . . "

Source:  Fire Board Sets February 24th As Date Of Election, The Pelham Sun, Feb. 9, 1923, p. 1, col. 1.

"FOSTER BEGINS 22ND YEAR AS FIRE CO. HEAD
-----
Nimphius, Powers and Van Cott Elected Captains of Three Companies in First Fire District.
-----

Charles W. Foster, Sr., of Fourth avenue, North Pelham, the only man to hold the office of president of Relief Hook & Ladder Co. No. 1 of the First Fire District, was re-elected to that office on Monday night at the annual meeting of the company.  Mr. Foster began his 22nd year in this office.  Gordon Miller was re-elected president of Liberty Engine and Hose Co. No. 1, and all other officers of both companies were re-elected.

A. C. Nimphius was again elected captain of the Hook and Ladder Company, with Harry Pickard and Howard Berger, first and second lieutenants, respectively.  The other officers elected in this company were:  James W. Caffrey, vice-president; William L. Dollny, treasurer; Edward Broege, recording secretary; A. A. Tegetmeier, financial secretary [illegible] seargeant-at-arms.

Robert Powers is again captain of Liberty Engine Company, and Henry Zeller and John Keppel, first and second lieutenants.  Other officers are William Reilly, vice-president James Bollettieri, financial secretary; James Black, recording secretary; Frederick Head, treasurer, and Christopher Cullen, sergeant-at-arms.

At the annual departmental election held last week, Chief Robert O. Reilly, First Deputy Chief Irving J. Wallach and Second Deputy Edward Field were re-elected for the next year.

D. Merrill Van Cott was elected captain of Pelham Height Hose Co. No. 2 at the annual meeting which was held recently.  Arthur Koppel was chosen first lieutenant and Richard Smith, Jr., second lieutenant and secretary."

Source:  FOSTER BEGINS 22ND YEAR AS FIRE CO. HEAD, The Pelham Sun, Mar. 10, 1933, p. 6, col. 1.

"New Secretary for Hose Co.

Kenneth C. Downing of Clifford avenue has resigned as secretary of Pelham Heights Hose Co. No. 2 and the work has been taken up by John W. Roche of Corlies avenue."

Source:  New Secretary for Hose Co., The Pelham Sun, Dec. 11, 1942, p. 11, col. 3.



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Wednesday, November 06, 2019

Was this the First Automobile Accident on Today's Pelham Bridge?


For about the last two hundred years, some form of bridge has stood above the waters of Eastchester Bay where the Hutchinson River meets Long Island Sound.  The histories of the several bridges that have stood there over the years are fascinating.  Often referenced as Pelham Bridge and, occasionally, Eastchester Bridge, the current version was built more than a century ago and opened to the public on October 15, 1908.  The Department of Transportation has announced that it plans to replace the current Pelham Bridge entirely with construction scheduled to begin in 2022.

I have written about the histories of the various bridges at that location numerous times.  A number of such articles, with links, are listed at the end of today's Historic Pelham article.

An odd incident in the early history of the current Pelham Bridge occurred only a few weeks after the bridge opened in mid-October, 1908.  The dramatic incident involved a 17-year-old young person named Henry Goodsell.

Though accounts differ, Henry Goodsell lived on the Upper West Side of Manhattan.  Late in the day on Friday, November 6, 1908, he was in his large touring car on Shore Road after dropping friends off in the region.  He was on his way back to the Upper West Side as he approached Shore Road.

Ahead, in the darkness, the draw of Pelham Bridge was open to let a vessel pass on the waters below.  The bridge tender, a man named Michael Selig (or Seelig, depending on the account) stood on the roadway tending a rope stretched across the roadway with two red signal lanterns hanging from the rope to warn approaching motorists.

As the vessel in the waters below passed, the bridge engineer began lowering the two halves of the draw.  As the two giant halves of the draw closed slowly, young Henry Goodsell came burning down Shore Road at the then incredible speed of thirty miles per hour.  The bridge tender saw the touring car approaching too fast and grabbed one of the two lanterns hanging from the rope.  He began swinging the lantern frantically, to no avail.

Henry Goodsell's touring car blew through the rope, slicing it like a hot knife through butter.  Goodsell realized his circumstance at the last moment and slammed on the brakes.  The car climbed the inclined draw just as the two halves were about to close.

The touring car barely made it through the steel jaws of the closing draw and plunged over the edge.  The bridge tender hear Henry Goodsell's scream as the touring car made a complete "somersault" before plunging into the waters of Eastchester Bay below, sending a "geyser" of water into the night air.

The bridge tender began scrambling down from the bridge to get to a nearby rowboat.  A second bridge tender, Elijah Miller, and the bridge engineer, John Beyer, also witnessed the accident and likewise scrambled down from the bridge to try to save the young man.

Once again, accounts differ, but clearly the car sank immediately.  The young driver was unconscious, but reportedly -- according to one account -- was found floating face up before he was dragged into a rowboat and taken ashore.  The three men called an ambulance and tended to the young man until he was transported to the hospital.

Miraculously, Henry Goodsell survived.  He was badly hurt with broken ribs and was in serious condition when taken to the hospital.  Yet, the three men had saved the young lad's life.

The touring car was left at the bottom of Eastchester Bay, although its location was marked with a float.



"NEW PELHAM PARK BRIDGE OVER EAST CHESTER BAY.
Formally opened yesterday.  Source:  NEW BRIDGE OPENED,
New-York Daily TribuneOct. 16, 1908, p. 12, cols. 2-3.  NOTE:
Click on Image to Enlarge.

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"AUTOMOBILE LEAPS THROUGH DRAW INTO BAY
-----
With Driver at Wheel Plunges Into 60 Feet of Water While Going at Full Speed -- Driver, Floating Unconscious, Rescued and Revived.
-----

New York, Nov. 8. -- A big motor car traveling more than thirty miles an hour, driven by Henry Goodsell, 17 years old, of No. 324 West Seventy-second street, its sole occupant, went through the open counter-balance draw on the new Eastchester bridge over Pelham bay last night, and plunged down into sixty feet of water.

Young Goodsell, who said he was the owner of the car, had taken a party of friends to New Rochelle and was returning to his home alone and driving at high speed along the road when he came in sight of the bridge.  The structure was recently opened and is not completed.  Instead of iron gates to protect passengers a heavy rope was used.

Michael Selig, one of the bridge tenders, was standing at the rope barrier as the draw had been opened to permit a vessel to pass through.  He saw the lights of the approaching car and realized that it was travelling at a high rate of speed.  The red lanterns hanging to the rope had evidently failed to warn the driver of the car, and Selig picked up one of them and waved it frantically as a signal for the automobile to stop, shouting a warning at the same time.

Goodsell put on the brakes, but too late, and the car tore through the rope barrier, ran up the platform and with a loud splash disappeared beneath the water.  The car barely missed being caught between the ends of the platform as they came together.

Selig shouted for help and called over the rail of the bridge below in a vain attempt to get a response from the driver of the car.  Failing, he climbed down one of the piers and set out in a rowboat to try to find the man.

Engineer John Beyer and Bridge Tender Elijah Miller, stationed on the opposite side of the span, had witnessed the accident and heard Selig's call for aid.  They also set out in a small boat and joined in the search.  After a few minutes they came upon the body of Goodsell.  He was unconscious, but was floating face up on top of the water.

A call was sent to the Fordham hospital, three miles away, and the three men worked over Goodsell while waiting for the ambulance.  They succeeded in resuscitating him and bringing him back to consciousness just as the ambulance arrived.  He gave his name and address.  The surgeon found that several of his ribs had been fractured and removed him to the hospital.  No attempt was made to recover the automobile, but a float was set to mark the place where it had disappeared."

Source:  AUTOMOBILE LEAPS THROUGH DRAW INTO BAY -- With Driver at Wheel Plunges Into 60 Feet of Water While Going at Full Speed -- Driver, Floating Unconscious, Rescued and Revived, The Topeka Daily Capital [Topeka, KS], Nov. 9, 1908, Vol. XXXII, No. 264, p. 1, cols. 4-6 (Note:  Paid subscription required to access via this link).  

"AUTOMOBILE AND BOY DROP INTO BAY
-----
Large Touring Car, Driven by Henry Goodsell, Plunges Through Draw of East Chester Bridge.
-----
LAD'S LIFE IS SAVED
-----

Driving a large touring automobile at a high rate of speed, Henry Goodsell, seventeen years old, who lives at No. 234 West Seventy-second street, plunged through the open draw of the East Chester Bridge, over Pelham Bay, yesterday afternoon, and the boy and machine tumbled thirty-five feet into the stream below.  Young Goodsell was rescued just in time to save his life, but the automobile lies at the bottom of the bay.  The boy was taken to the Fordham Hospital, where it was found he was suffering from a fractured rib, possibly internal injuries and submersion.

Alone in the car, Goodsell was on his way home from City Island when he approached the bridge.  The structure has not been finished, and in lieu of a gate which could be closed against vehicles and pedestrians when the draw is open ropes are stretched across the roadway.

It was about half-past five o'clock when Michael Seelig, watchman on the bridge, saw the automobile coming along at a furious pace, and he ran out and waved his arms, at the same time shouting to John Byer, engineer in charge of the construction work, to close the draw.

Before Byer could reach the levers the car had cut through the ropes as if they were threads of silk, and as the boy uttered a scream of fright the machine turned a somersault in the air and, striking the water with a splash that sent up a geyser, sank to the bottom.  Seelig ran to the foot of one of the piers, jumped into a boat and rowed toward the spot where the machine and boy had gone down.  Byer and Elijah Miller, a bridge tender, also put out in another rowboat, but before they could pull far Goodsell had risen and sunk several times.

He had gone under the surface again when both boats reached the spot, and Byer, stripping off only his coat, plunged overboard.  He caught the lad in his arms and just managed to lift him into Seelig's boat.  When the shore was reached Goodsell was taken to Geck's Hotel and a call for an ambulance was sent to Fordham Hospital, three miles away.  Meantime, the three men worked over the unconscious boy, and when Dr. O'Reilly arrived he said that while his condition was serious it was likely that he would recover.

In the hospital Goodsell told the policemen that he as the owner of the automobile, but because of his youth this statement was doubted, and an investigation was begun.  It was promptly learned that the lad had told the truth.  He is the son of a lawyer now dead, and lives with his mother at the address he gave.  When an inquirer called there Mrs. Goodsell was at a front window, watching for her son, and she fainted when she learned of the accident.  When she had been revived sufficiently she started for Fordham Hospital to see the boy."

Source:  AUTOMOBILE AND BOY DROP INTO BAY -- Large Touring Car, Driven by Henry Goodsell, Plunges Through Draw of East Chester Bridge -- LAD'S LIFE IS SAVEDN.Y. Herald, Nov. 7, 1908, p. 1, col. 5.  

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Below are examples of previous postings that address the histories of the various Pelham Bridges that have spanned Eastchester Bay for the last two centuries.

Thu., Oct. 13, 2016:  The Eastchester Bridge Company Raised Tolls on Pelham Bridge Before It Was Even Built.

Wed., Oct. 12, 2016:  More on the Early History of Pelham Bridge Including Ownership of the Bridge Between 1834 and 1860.

Tue., Oct. 11, 2016:  Is It Possible The First Pelham Bridge Built in About 1815 Was Repaired After Near Destruction by a Storm?

Wed., Oct. 1, 2014:  Bridge Keepers of the Pelham Bridge from 1870 to 1872.

Mon., Jul. 21, 2014:  Image of the Second Pelham Bridge Built in 1834 From a Sketch Created in 1865.

Thu., Jul. 17, 2014:  Sabotage Brought Down the 70-Ton Draw Span of Pelham Bridge in 1908 and Delayed its Opening

Tue., Jun. 10, 2014: Construction of the Concrete Arch Pelham Bridge.

Mon., May 12, 2014: The March 6, 1812 New York Statute Authorizing Construction of the Pelham Bridge.

Tue., Sep. 22, 2009: Names of Early "Keepers of Pelham Bridge" Appointed by Westchester County.

Thu., Jan. 08, 2009: Another Brief History of The Pelham Bridge.

Thu., Jan. 1, 2009: A Brief History of Pelham Bridge.

Wed., Jan. 2, 2008: New York State Senate Report on Petition by Inhabitants of Westchester to Allow Construction of Toll Bridge Across Eastchester Creek in 1834.

Tue., Aug. 28, 2007: The Laying Out of Pelham Avenue From Fordham to Pelham Bridge in 1869.

Wed., Jul. 4, 2007: 1857 Real Estate Advertisement for Sale of the Pelham Bridge.

Fri., Jul. 22, 2007: 1857 Real Estate Advertisement for Sale of "Country Seat" at Pelham Bridge.

Fri., May 18, 2007: Celebration at Pelham Bridge in 1872.

Wed., May 16, 2007: Board of Supervisors of Westchester County Vote to Build New Iron Bridge to Replace Pelham Bridge in 1869.

Tue., May 15, 2007: The Owner of the Pelham Bridge Hotel Sold it for the Princely Sum of $22,000 in 1869.

Mon., May 14, 2007: Plans to Widen Shore Road in the Town of Pelham in 1869.

Fri., May 11, 2007: A Sad Attempted Suicide at Pelham Bridge in 1869.

Thu., Dec. 08, 2005: The First Stone Bridge Built Across Eastchester Creek in Pelham, 1814-1815.

Thu., Aug. 18, 2005: The Opening of the New Iron "Pelham Bridge" in 1871.

Tue., Aug. 9, 2005: Cock Fighting at Pelham Bridge in the 19th Century.

Thu., Jul. 21, 2005: Today's Remnants of the Bartow Station on the Branch Line Near City Island.

Tue., Jun. 28, 2005: The Hotel and Bar Room at Pelham Bridge.

Thu., Mar. 24, 2005: The Bartow Area of Pelham in the 19th Century: Where Was It?

Wed., Mar. 23, 2005: Prize Fighting at Pelham Bridge in 1884.

For more about the Pelham Bridge and its history, see Pelham Bridge, Wikipedia The Free Encyclopedia, available at http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pelham_Bridge (visited May 6, 2014).

Archive of the Historic Pelham Web Site.
Home Page of the Historic Pelham Blog.

Order a Copy of "Thomas Pell and the Legend of the Pell Treaty Oak."

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Tuesday, November 05, 2019

The Election of Pelham Patriot Philip Pell III to Congress in 1788 Over Alexander Hamilton and Others


Today is town-wide election day in the Town of Pelham!  All Pelham residents in both villages should exercise their right and privilege to vote today!  

In honor of election day, today's Historic Pelham article will detail an important election held in the earliest days of our Republic.  In that election, famed Pelham Revolutionary War hero Philip Pell III defeated Alexander Hamilton and others to be named one of five members of Congress to represent the State of New York as a delegate to the United States Congress "for one year, or until the new constitution shall be put into operation."

Philip Pell III

Philip Pell I of the Manor of Pelham was a son of Thomas Pell (referenced by members of the Pell family as "Third Lord of the Manor of Pelham) who died between December 21, 1751 and May 27, 1752. He married Hannah Mott. 

Philip Pell I and Hannah Mott had a son they named Philip. Philip Pell II (b. 1732; d. 1788) married Gloria Tredwell and is believed to have built the original Pell farmhouse that forms a portion of the home that still stands at 45 Iden Avenue known as Pelhamdale, listed on the National Register of Historic Places. 

Philip Pell II and Gloria Tredwell had a son they also named Philip. Philip Pell III, often referenced in some records, confusingly, as Philip Pell, Jr. as is his father, occasionally), became an illustrious citizen of Pelham. He served as Deputy Judge Advocate General of the Continental Army. Some have claimed he served for a time, as Acting Judge Advocate General during the Revolutionary War. He rode triumphantly with George Washington into Manhattan on Evacuation Day at the close of the War. He served as a Delegate to the Continental Congress, a member of the New York State Assembly, a Regent of the University of the State of New York, and Surrogate of Westchester County. Philip Pell III lived in a home that he built near today's Colonial Avenue (the old Boston Post Road) and today's Cliff Avenue on a farm that encompassed much of today's Pelham Heights and the grounds of the Pelham Memorial High School.

Background of the Election

In late 1788, the nation was in an unusual state.  The Articles of Confederation that preceded the United States Constitution were still in force.  Although New Hampshire became the critical ninth State to ratify the new Constitution only months before on June 21, 1788.  The new government under the new Constitution, however, was not scheduled to begin operations until March 4, 1789.

On December 15, 1788, the State Assembly of the State of New York began a multi-day session during which, among other things, it had to elect, with the New York Senate, a slate of men to serve as delegates to the United States Congress to represent the State of New York "for one year, or until the new constitution shall be put into operation."

The first order of business that day was for the Assembly to determine how many delegates should be sent to represent the State in Congress.  There previously had been three such representatives.  However, given transportation and other difficulties of the day, the State occasionally was left unrepresented at critical times because no one was able to attend.  The Assembly (and later the State Senate), voted to expand the number it would send from three to five.

The following day (December 16, 1788), the Assembly considered and voted to choose five men from among eleven candidates to represent the State in Congress.  Among those considered was Philip Pell III who, at the time, was an Anti-Federalist and resident of the newly-established Town of Pelham that had been created by the State Legislature only months before on March 7, 1788.  Another candidate considered was ardent Federalist and American Patriot Alexander Hamilton.  The final tally was:

Abraham Yates, Jr.              34
John Hathorn                       31
Philip Pell                             30
David Gelston                      29
Samuel Jones                      26
Leonard Gansevoort            23
Alexander Hamilton             22
Egbert Benson                     21
Ezra L'Hommedieu              21
John Lawrence                    17
Z. Platt                                   1

After the vote, members of the State Senate attended in the Assembly chamber for a joint session.  When the Senate presented the five delegates it had chosen, all had been rejected by the Assembly.  The five chosen by the Senate were:  Alexander Hamilton, Ezra L'Hommedieu, John Lawrence, Egbert Benson, and Leonard Gansevoort.

After a little good old fashioned arm-twisting, a joint ballot of the Assembly and Senate was conducted.  The final tally was:

Abraham Yates, jun.        39
David Gelston                  37
John Hathorn                   37
Philip Pell                         37
Samuel Jones                  36
Ezra L'Hommedieu          33
Alexander Hamilton         32
Egbert Benson                32
Leonard Gansevoort       32
John Lawrence                29
Thomas Tredwell              1

The joint session elected the same five men that the House originally chose:  Abraham Yates, Jr.; David Gelston; John Hathorn; Philip Pell; and Samuel Jones.  Those five were declared to be the duly elected delegates to represent New York in the United States in Congress assembled, "for one year, or until the new constitution shall be put into operation."  The Town of Pelham's own Philip Pell III was among the five.

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I have written on numerous occasions about famed American Patriot Philip Pell III.  For examples, see:

Mon., Feb. 15, 2016:  More on Revolutionary War Patriot Philip Pell, Jr. of the Manor of Pelham.  

Tue., Mar. 07, 2017:  Philip Pell of the Manor of Pelham Was a Commissioner to Partition Manor of Scarsdale Lands.  









Fri., Mar. 9, 2007:  Abstract of Will of Philip Pell, Sr. of the Manor of Pelham Prepared in 1751 and Proved in 1752.  [This is an abstract of the will of the father of Col. Philip Pell.] 







The Homestead of Colonel Philip Pell III that Once Stood
Near Today's Colonial Avenue (the old Boston Post Road)
and Today's Cliff Avenue.  Source:  Montgomery, William R.
& Montgomery, Frances E., Colonel Philip Pell (1753-1811)
Abridged from "The Pells of Pelham," The Pelham Sun, Oct.
21, 1938, pg. 11, col. 3.  NOTE:  Click on Image to Enlarge.




Granite and Bronze Memorial to Col. Philip Pell III on
Grounds of the Pelham Memorial High School.  Source:
Photograph by the Author, 2004.  NOTE:  Click on Image
to Enlarge.

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Below are two newspaper accounts describing the events that are the subject of today's Historic Pelham article.  Each is followed by a citation and link to its source.

"American Intelligence.
-----

NEW-YORK, Dec. 26, 
Proceedings of the Legislature.
HOUSE OF ASSEMBLY.

Monday, December 15, 1788.

THE fee bill was read a second time, and committed.

The bill for putting the constitution into operation, was also read a second time and committed.

A message was received from the Senate, non-concurring with the resolution for choosing only 3 members of Congress, and proposing 5 if they also sent another resolution, requiring the House to appoint a committee, to meet a committee from the Senate, to take into consideration the appointment of a State Printer.

On motion of Mr. Jones, the last resolution was agreed to, without opposition; and Messrs. Adgate, J. Van Rensellaer, Hoffman, B. Livingston, and Havens, were appointed on the part of the House.  [The committee from the Senate are General Schuyler, Mr. Lawrence, and Mr. Tredwell.]

Mr. Harrison then moved to concur with the Senate in the resolution for appointing five delegates to Congress.

Mr. Speaker, said he, when that matter was before the House on Saturday, I remember that the principal argument for having only 3, was the additional expence.  In matters of such infinite importance, the article of expence ought not to be principally attended to; it was also observed, that we had formerly been represented by three.  Sir, the conduct of government for deviating from the number and electing 5, is a strong reason why we should agree with the proposition now before us; for, if there had not been cogent reasons for increasing the number, it certainly would not have been done. -- I believe the true reason was, that by appointing only three, the State was seldom represented.  We may better prefer the certainty of a representation, to a trifling expence; and though the present delegation, it is true, is to be only for a short period, yet in this interval consequences may arise which may affect the latest posterity.  Congress may enter into treaties, or other important negotiations that may highly interest our happiness and [illegible.]  We ought not, therefore, to fac[illegible] safety to trifles.  I hope, sir, we sha[illegible] with the Senate.

The question being taken, it was agreed to unanimously.

Mr. Jones moved for leave and brought in a bill for the relief of debtors with the respect to the imprisonment of their persons, which being read a first time was ordered a second reading.

Went into a committee on the Governor's speech.  

Mr. Low in the chair.

After some time spent thereon, the committee rose and reported that they had agreed to a resolution for passing a bill to comply with the requisition of Congress for the year 1788. -- This resolution was adopted by the house, and the committee of ways and means directed to bring in the bill.

Adjourned.

Tuesday, December 16.

The bill for the relief of debtors, with respect to the imprisonment of their persons, was read a second time and committed.

The house then took up the day to nominate and appoint five delegates to Congress.

The following is a correct list of the votes:

A. Yates, jun.                    34
J. Hathorn                        31
Ph. Pell                             30
D. Gelston                        29
S. Jones                           26
L. Gansevoort                  23
Alex. Hamilton                  22
Egbert Benson                 21
E. L'Hommedieu              21
J. Lawrence                     17
Z. Platt                               1

Mr. Yates, Mr. Jones, Mr. Pell, Mr. Gelston, and Mr. Hathorn, having the greatest number of votes, the house resolved that, on the part of the assembly, they were nominated delegates to represent this State in Congress.

The Senate soon after attending in the assembly-chamber to compare the nominations of both houses, it appeared that they had differed wholly with the assembly, having nominated Mr. Hamilton, Mr. L'Hommedieu, Mr. Lawrence, Mr. Benson, and Mr. Gansevoort.

The two houses then proceeded to ballot for five delegates to Congress -- and the votes being collected, stood as follows:

Abraham Yates, jun.        39
David Gelston                  37
John Hathorn                   37
Philip Pell                         37
Samuel Jones                  36
Ezra L'Hommedieu          33
Alexander Hamilton         32
Egbert Benson                32
Leonard Gansevoort       32
John Lawrence                29
Thomas Tredwell              1

Mr. Yates, Mr. Gelston, Mr. Hathorn, Mr. Pell, and Mr. Jones, were then declared to be the duly elected delegates to represent this State in the United States in Congress assembled, for one year, or until the new constitution shall be put into operation.

The house then adjourned.

Wednesday, December 17.

The house then went into a committee on the bill for putting the new constitution into operation:

Mr. Havens in the chair.

The bill having been read, was then taken up by paragraphs.

When the first paragraph was read, which was in substance, that the Senators should be appointed in the mode prescribed by the constitution of this State for the election of members of Congress.

Mr. Harrison got up, and moved for the following clause to be substituted in lieu thereof:

'After which nomination the Senate and assembly shall meet together and compare the lists of the persons respectively nominated, and if the same person or persons is or are named on both lists, he or they shall be Senator or Senators for the united States; but if the said list shall agree only as to one of the persons therein named, and in all cafes where only one person is to be chosen and the two nominations disagree, then, one half of the persons named in such lists and not included in both, shall be chosen by the joint ballot of the Senators and members of assembly so met together as aforesaid, but if more than one person is to be chosen, and the lists shall not agree as to either of the persons named therein, then the members of the Senate shall at such meeting chuse by ballot one of the persons nominated as aforesaid by the assembly, and the members of the assembly shall in like manner chuse one of the persons nominated as aforesaid by the Senate, and the two persons so chosen shall be Senators for the United States.' 

On this motion a very lengthy debate ensued.

The following, is a list of the votes on the question to agree to the amendments.

For the affirmative.

Mr. B. Livingston
Mr. Gilbert 
Mr. Van Cortlandt
Mr. Seaman
Mr. Barker
Mr. Harrison
Mr. Hoffman
Mr. H. V. Rensellaer
Mr. Younglove
Mr. Watts
Mr. Ph. Livingston
Mr. Borton
Mr. Low
Mr. Bancker
Mr. Vandervoort
Mr. Rockwell
Mr. Verplank
Mr. Cornwell
Mr. Giles
Mr. Dongan.
-----20.

For the negative.

Mr. Jones
Mr. Carman
Mr. G. Livingston
Mr. Kortz
Mr. Yates
Mr. Frey
Mr. Staring
Mr. Speaker
Mr. Van Dyke
Mr. J. V. Rensellaer
Mr. Hardenbergh
Mr. Veeder
Mr. Winn
Mr. Duncan
Mr. Tearce
Mr. Savage
Mr. Webster
Mr. McCracken
Mr. Thomson
Mr. Bay
Mr. Schoonmaker
Mr. Tappen
Mr. Griffin
Mr. Carpenter
Mr. J. Smith
Mr. Dewitt
Mr. Wisher
Mr. Adgate
Mr. Harpur
Mr. Schenk
Mr. Akins.
-----31.

The question on the original paragraph was then put, and carried in the affirmative.  

The committee then rose, and the house adjourned."

Source:  American IntelligenceThe Independent Gazeteer; or the Chronicle of Freedom [Philadelphia, PA], Jan. 2, 1789, Vol. VIII, No. 953, p. 1, col. 3p. 2, cols. 1-3 (Note:  Paid subscription required to access via this link).

"POUGHKEEPSIE, Dec. 30.
-----
House of Assembly.

Monday, December 15.

THE Honorable the Senate having non concurred the resolution of this House, for electing three Delegates to represent this State in Congress; they offered for concurrence a resolution, in substance, that on Tuesday next, at 12 o'clock, both Houses proceed to nominate five Delegates to represent this State in the Congress of the United States for the present year.  Which was agreed to.

Another resolution was received from the Hon. the Senate; That committees of both Houses be appointed to inquire into and report, what arrangements in the Printing Business of the State, may be proper for the Legislature to adopt.

Mr. Jones moved for leave and bro't in a bill, for the relief of debtors with respect to their persons; which was read the first time, and ordered a second reading.

Adjourned till to-morrow.

Tuesday, December 16.

The bill for the relief of insolvent debtors, &c. was read a second time, and committed to a committee of the whole.  

The order of the day, for the nomination of Delegates to represent this State in Congress, being read, the House proceeded on that business, & the members present severally nominated five persons -- And Abraham Yates, jun., David Gelston, Philip Pell, John Hathorn, and Samuel Jones, Esquires, were nominated.

After which the Hon. the Senate attended in the Assembly chamber -- when on comparing the lists, it appeared that the Senate had nominated Ezra L'Hommedieu, Egbert Benson, Leonard Gansevoort, Alexander Hamilton, and John Lawrence, Esquires.

Whereupon both houses proceeded by joint ballot, to chuse five of the said ten persons, to be Delegates to represent this State in the Congress of the United States for the present year, or until the new Constitution shall be organized; and on counting the votes, it appeared that Abraham Yates, jun., David Gelston, Philip Pell, John Hathorn, and Samuel Jones, Esquires, were elected.  

Adjourned till to morrow.

Wednesday, December 17.

Several petitions were read and com[illegible].

Mr. Havens, from the committee of the whole, on the bill, for carrying into effect, on the part of this State, the Constitution of the United States, reported further progress.

Mr. Jones moved for leave, & brought in a bill, for the further amendment of the law, which was read the first time, and ordered a second reading.

Adjourned till to morrow.

Thursday, December 18.

The bill last mentioned bill, was read a second time, and committed to a committee of the whole.

Mr. Jones, from the committee appointed to draft an address in answer to his Excellency the Governor's speech, reported, that they had prepared a draft, which he read in his place, and delivered in at the table, where it was again read, and committed to a committee of the whole.

Mr. Havens, from the committee of the whole, on the bill, for carrying into effect the new Constitution, reported further progress.

A message was received from the Honorable the Senate, with a bill, for regulating the manner of appointing Electors who are to elect a President and Vice-President of the United States of America, which was read the first time and ordered a second reading.

Adjourned till to morrow.

Friday, December 19.

The bill, for regulating the appointing electors, &c. was read a second time, and committed to a committee of the whole.

Several petitions were read, and committed.

Mr. Havens, from the committee of the whole, on the bill for carrying into effect the new Constitution, reported further progress.

Adjourned till to morrow.

Saturday, December 20.

Mr. Havens, from the committee of the whole, on the last mentioned bill, reported, that on coming to the blank in the bill where the allowance per day to the electors to nominate the President and Vice president was inserted, Mr. Speaker made a motion, that the words 'twenty shillings' should be inserted in the said blank; which was carried in the affirmative, on a division.

That the committee had gone through the bill and made amendments, which he was directed to report to the House; and he read the report in his place, and delivered the bill and amendments in at the table, where the same were again read, agreed to, and ordered to be engrossed.

Adjourned till Monday.

-----

The Honorable Philip Schuyler, and the Honorable Robert Yates, Esquires, are nominated by the Honorable, the Senate, to represent this State in the Senate of the United States."

Source:  POUGHKEEPSIE, Dec. 30 -- House of Assembly, ThoThe Country Journal, and Dutchess and Ulster County Farmer's Register [Poughkeepsie Journal] [Poughkeepsie, NY], Dec. 30, 1788, No. 178, p. 3, cols. 1-2 (Note:  Paid subscription required to access via this link).  


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