Historic Pelham

Presenting the rich history of Pelham, NY in Westchester County: current historical research, descriptions of how to research Pelham history online and genealogy discussions of Pelham families.

Wednesday, July 30, 2014

Yet Another Attempt in 1894 to Resurrect the Glory Days of Coaching to Pelham

Yesterday I posted an item to the Historic Pelham Blog regarding the spectacle of "coaching to Pelham" in four-in-hand carriages during the 1870s and 1880s.  Col. Delancey Kane began the practice during the 1870s and many followed in his footsteps. Here is a link to yesterday's post:  Mon., Jul. 29, 2014:  Wonderful Description of Coaching to Pelham on the Tally-Ho's First Trip of the Season on May 1, 1882.  To read more about the curious fad, see the lengthy list of previous articles and postings at the end of this article.

In 1876 a horse-drawn road coach known as “The Pelham Coach” began running between New York City’s Hotel Brunswick and the “Pelham Manor” of yore.  This road coach was not a simple hired coach that ferried passengers from New York City in the days before Henry Ford mass produced his Model T.  Rather, this road coach was driven by Colonel Delancey Kane, one of the so-called “millionaire coachmen,” who engaged in a sport known as “public coaching” or “road coaching” as it sometimes was called.  The sport, conducted pursuant to the published rules of The New York Coaching Club, has been described as follows: 

“Public coaching, as it was called when it was a flourishing anachronism in the latter part of the nineteenth century and the early years of the twentieth, is . . . now quite forgotten. It was one of those curious but artificial customs that suddenly drop into oblivion. . . . [Records of the sport] furnish a droll and flickering insight into the lives of that very small group of Americans, born and bred to wealth and leisure, whose influence on the nation’s social and economic life was so disproportionate to their numbers.”

The Pelham Coach was not the only coach that ran to Pelham.  Over years, there were various efforts to extend the sport of public coaching.  After Delancey Kane stopped running the Pelham Coach and, later, the coach named "Tally Ho", others attempted to resurrect the sport in the New York metropolitan area.  As I previously have written (see below), other such coaches that ran after Delancey Kane ended his public coaching to Pelham career included the Tantivy and the Greyhound.   

Today's posting to the Historic Pelham Blog provides information about efforts in 1894 to resurrect the sport of public coaching.  J. Clinch Smith began running a four-in-hand coach named "Tempest" from Hotel Brunswick to the Westchester Country Club.  The Tempest did not, however, run between the Hotel Brunswick and Pelham.  By 1894, after New York City created Pelham Bay Park, the Westchester Country Club had moved to nearby Throgg's Neck.  Still, the story of the Tempest provides a fascinating glimpse of the closing years of the 19th century when some tried to resurrect the spectacle of the sport of public coaching brought to the United States by Delancey Kane who began running his Pelham Coach between Hotel Brunswick and the Arcularius Hotel at Pelham Bridge in 1876.  

Below is an image and the text of an article about the first successful run of the Tempest on April 16, 1894.  The article recounts the glory of the original Pelham Coach that inspired the Tempest's journey.  



"RETURN OF THE COACH 'TEMPEST.'"
Showing the Tempest in front of the Hotel Brunswick.
Source:  ROAD COACHING IN EARNEST, N.Y. Herald,
Apr. 17, 1894, p. 9, cols. 1-2.

"ROAD COACHING IN EARNEST.
-----
The Tempest Makes Her First Regular Trip to the Country Club in Fine Shape.
-----
WEATHER GRAND AND ROADS GOOD
-----
A Full List of Passengers Was Taken Out and Back and All Were Enthusiastic.
-----
MANY WITNESSED THE START.
-----

IT is a pretty well established fact that history repeats itself -- sometimes pleasantly and at other times unpleasantly.  Under the former head should certainly be put any revival of the grand sport of coaching.  It is a sport nowadays, but let us not forget there was a time not so many years ago either, when it was, so to speak, quite as stern a reality as is a Pullman car to-day and as little tinged with romance.

We can't get away from coaching, however.  It may seem to lag for a while, but invariably 'bobs up serenly,' and well it is, particularly in our rushing New York, where most folks live far too much on a machine-made principle. 

As I stood in front of the Brunswick yesterday and watched the start of Mr. J. Clinch Smith's coach Tempest on the first of the regular daily trips -- Sundays excepted -- it is to make from now until June 1, between the hostelry named and the Country Club at Westchester, my mind drifted back to a fine spring morning -- May 1, 1876 -- when Colonel De Lancey Kane, the pioneer of road coaching in this country, pulled out from the same spot with his Pelham coach on its inaugural trip.

THE OLD PELHAM COACH.

Every one knows that the Pelham Coach ran successfully for several consecutive seasons.  It is doubtful if a country club at West Chester had even been dreamt of then, so the destination was the old Arcularius Hotel at Pelham Bridge, where lunch was served.  The time schedule was about the same as that now arranged by Mr. J. Clinch Smith for the Tempest.  

The Pelham coach was abandoned after a few seasons, but a few years later the Tantivy was put on the road by Mr. Frederic Bronson and Mr. J. Roosevelt Roosevelt.  This coach ran every spring until four years ago.  Since then there have been one or two rather lukewarm efforts to put on a public coach between New York and different adjacent points, but without much success.

The prospects are, however, that the Tempest will be liberally patronized.  Mr. J. Clinch Smith and Mr. Francis T. Underhill are to be the coachmen and the former has furnished an excellent road coach and several teams of the first quality.

The start yesterday was made promptly at eleven o'clock.  It was an ideal spring day, and by half-past ten there had gathered in front of the hotel many promising coaching men.  Among these were the Messrs. De Lancey A. Kane, Frederic Bronson, Perry Belmont, Frederick Gebbard, De Courcey Forbes, W. R. Travers, William Eldridge, Leonard Jacob, Hamilton Cary and Ashton Lemoine.

Mr. Francis T. Underhill was coachman out and Mr. J. Clinch Smith back, and the passengers were Mr. Francis Watson, who had the box seat; Merrs. George de Forest Grant, J. G. Follansbee, M. N. R. Davis, Robert W. Stuart, W. R. Hoyt, J. S. A. Davis, J. Hopkinson Smith, Charles Coster, Eben Wright and De Forest Manice.

ALONG THE ROUTE.

As told inSaturday, the route is through the Park and by Seventh avenue to 135th street, thence to and up St. Nicholas avenue, to Washington Bridge, across the bridge and past the Berkeley Oval to Jerome Park Corners, thence through Fordham and West Chester villages and past Morris Park to the Country Club.

A stop was made at the Plaza Hotel.  Teams were changed at 136th street and St. Nicholas avenue and at Jerome Park Corners.  

The Tempest arrived at the club at five minutes to one o'clock, schedule time.  Luncheon was immediately served.  The return journey was begun at twenty minutes to four o'clock and the Brunswick reached at half-past five.

Everything went as smoothly as could be desired, barring a slight mishap in front of the Brunswick.  One of the leaders was struck by an omnibus and lost his footing for a moment.  

All told, however, the first regular trip was pronounced if possible even more successful than the trial.  In the interval after luncheon and before starting home there was some informal pigeon shooting.  Three sweepstakes were contested for, the winners being the Messrs. Oliver Iselin, George de Forest Grant and Eben Wright.

The party to-day will include, among others, Messrs. George H. Mairs, Eben Wright, Roland W. Smith and Alexander M. Griswold.

Mr. F. M. Vermilye has the coach for Thursday.  Messrs. Center Hitchcock and Robert A. Osborn for April 20 and 21.  Mr. Stanford White has taken the whole coach for April 26 and Mr. J. W. A. Davis has booked as far ahead as May 30, when he will have the entire coach."

Source:  ROAD COACHING IN EARNEST, N.Y. Herald, Apr. 17, 1894, p. 9, cols. 1-2.  

*          *          *          *          *

Below is a list of articles and blog postings that I previously have posted regarding the subject of "Coaching to Pelham."  

Bell, Blake A., Col. Delancey Kane and "The Pelham Coach" (Sep. 2003).

Mon., Jul. 29, 2014:  Wonderful Description of Coaching to Pelham on the Tally-Ho's First Trip of the Season on May 1, 1882.

Wed., Apr. 14, 2010:  Col. Delancey Kane Changes the Timing and Route of The Pelham Coach in 1876.

Tue., Sep. 08, 2009:  1877 Advertisement with Timetable for the Tally Ho Coach to Pelham.

Mon., Mar. 23, 2009:  The Greyhound and the Tantivy-- The Four-in-Hand Coaches that Succeeded Col. Delancey Kane's "Tally-Ho" to Pelham.

Fri., Jan. 16, 2009: The Final Trip of the First Season of Col. Delancey Kane's "New-Rochelle and Pelham Four-in-Hand Coach Line" in 1876.

Thu., Jan. 15, 2009:  The First Trip of Col. Delancey Kane's "New-Rochelle and Pelham Four-in-Hand Coach Line" on May 1, 1876.

Thu., Mar. 06, 2008:  Auctioning the Tantivy's Horses at the Close of the 1886 Coaching Season.

Wed., Mar. 05, 2008:  Coaching to Pelham: The Tantivy Has an Accident on its Way to Pelham in 1886.  

Thu., Jan. 24, 2008:  An Account of the First Trip of Colonel Delancey Kane's Tally-Ho to Open the 1880 Coaching Season.

Tuesday, Jan. 8, 2008: Brief "History of Coaching" Published in 1891 Shows Ties of Sport to Pelham, New York

Thursday, August 3, 2006: Images of Colonel Delancey Kane and His "Pelham Coach" Published in 1878.

Wednesday, September 28, 2005: Taunting the Tantivy Coach on its Way to Pelham: 1886.

Wednesday, July 27, 2005: 1882 Engraving Shows Opening of Coaching Season From Hotel Brunswick to Pelham Bridge.

Thu., Jun. 09, 2005:  Coaching to Pelham: Colonel Delancey Astor Kane Did Not Operate the Only Coach to Pelham.

Fri., Feb. 11, 2005:  Col. Delancey Kane's "Pelham Coach", Also Known as The Tally-Ho, Is Located.

Bell, Blake A., Col. Delancey Kane and "The Pelham Coach", The Pelham Weekly, Vol. XII, No. 38, Sept. 26, 2003, p. 1, col. 1.

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Tuesday, July 29, 2014

Wonderful Description of Coaching to Pelham on the Tally-Ho's First Trip of the Season on May 1, 1882


I have posted many items to the Historic Pelham Blog regarding the spectacle of "coaching to Pelham" in four-in-hand horse-drawn carriages during the 1870s and 1880s. Colonel Delancey Kane began the practice during the 1870s.  Many followed in his footsteps. To read a little about the curious fad, see the lengthy list of previous articles and postings at the end of this article.

In 1876 a horse-drawn road coach known as “The Pelham Coach” began running between New York City’s Hotel Brunswick and the “Pelham Manor” of yore.  This road coach was not a simple hired coach that ferried passengers from New York City in the days before Henry Ford mass produced his Model T.  Rather, this road coach was driven by Colonel Delancey Kane, one of the so-called “millionaire coachmen,” who engaged in a sport known as “public coaching” or “road coaching” as it sometimes was called.  The purpose of the sport was to rush the carriage between designated points on a specified schedule and to maintain that schedule rigorously.

Colonel Delancey Kane became quite famous for his handling of The Pelham Coach, a bright canary yellow coach that was cheered along its route from the Hotel Brunswick in New York City to Pelham Bridge in the Town of Pelham.  The iconic image that appeared on song sheets, in etchings and engravings distributed throughout the United States shows The Pelham Coach.



Colonel Delancey Kane and The Pelham Coach
During a "Coaching to Pelham" Excursion.

Colonel Kane and The Pelham Coach, later known as the "Tally-Ho," were known near and far.  Numerous songs were written devoted to the topic of coaching to Pelham.  At least one toy was inspired by coach, a mechanical toy known as the "Tally-Ho" released in 1885.  The toy, a rare cast iron mechanical toy between 27 and 28 inches long depicts Colonel Kane's canary yellow "Tally Ho."  One example of the rare toy has sold at auction for $86,000.00.



1885 Carpenter Cast Iron Mechanical Toy.
The "Tally Ho," Between 27 and 28 Inches Long.

Today's posting to the Historic Pelham Blog transcribes the text of an article published in the May 2, 1882 issue of the New York Herald.  The article describes in lovely detail what it was like to ride the Tally Ho to Pelham Bridge on May 1, 1882, the opening day of the 1882 coaching season.  The article does an excellent job of describing the pageantry, the route and even the sounds of the ride that day.

"AGAIN ON THE ROAD.
-----
The Tally-Ho's First Trip Through Freshening Country.
-----
A MERRY COACHING PARTY.
-----
Colonel De Lancey Kane's Lively Spin from New York to Pelham.
-----

A glorious May morning, cloudless, bright, crisp and sunshiny, for the first trip of the Pelham Coach.  It was the quintessence of a coaching day.  There was a snap in the air.  There was cheer in the sunlight.  The dust was laid and the road was open.

At half-past ten o'clock sharp the Tally-Ho stood in front of the Brunswick.  Spick-and-span [sic] looked the canary drag, and right smart was Colonel Delancey Kane as he took the ribbons and Fownes, the guard, as he flourished the horn, both in their new English coaching coats and yellow favors.  Mrs. Delancey Kane took the box seat.  Mr. Frederick Bronson and Mr. Robert Hone sat next, with Mrs. Colonel Jay and Mrs. Hugo Fritsch.  On the back seats were Mr. C. O. Beach with Mrs. Frederick Bronson and Mrs. Adrian Iselin, Jr.  A throng stood around the door of the Brunswick.  Faces peered from windows across the way.  An equipage or two flashed in the glittering vista of the avenue.  All ready for Pelham!  So crack whip, wind horn and away.  Colonel Kane shook out the ribbons.  The leaders plunged forward, and then with a hurrah from the onlookers, a waved adieu from a cloud of handkerchiefs and a cheery note from the guard, the Tally Ho rolled off upon its opening trip.

A light chestnut, Nora, was the near wheeler; a dark chestnut, Countess, the off wheeler.  Spider, an iron gray, and Gamecock, a light chestnut, were the near and off leaders.  Away they went over the stones of the avenue, between the long line of brown stone houses from which hands were waved and faces smiled.  The way was clear.  Not a dozen carriages were abroad.  The canary coach rolled straight along without swerving.

THROUGH THE PARK.

And now the wheels crunch on the gravel of Central Park, and the trees nod on either side, and the green turf, just freshening at the touch of the springtime sun, sweeps away over the hills and hollows.  The sky is a delicate blue.  White clouds scud across it like strayed revellers [sic] hurrying from the light.  The fresh, clear air of morning is puffed full in the faces of the coaching party.  It is delicious.  Whoever is astir hurries after the Tally-Ho.  Here a Park keeper, gray as his uniform, salutes it.  There a nurse and her little charge gaze at it open-mouthed.  Cheery salutes are wafted from vehicles going by, and now with a great clamor and clapping of hands a flock of children gone merry-making leave the May-pole rigged on the green and come flying down helter-skelter to greet the bright colored drag rolling by them.  They chase it, clap their hands gleefully and throw childish responses after the handkerchiefs waved to them from it.

An open space, a cheer up above and the coach sweeps past the gray stone needle of Cleopatra pointing skyward, with an irreverent cluster of moderns at its base frantically tossing their hats.  Presently it is out of the Park altogether and draws up at the Point View House, at 110th street to change horses, Gray Fenian and Bay Lorillard are the near and off wheelers now; Gray Ginger and Bay Cockade the near and off leaders.  The horn winds, the whip cracks and they are off skimming along the boulevard.  they wheel into 123d street, pass Mount Morris Park, swing about into Fifth avenue and so on up to 129th street, where they cross to Third avenue.  The music of the guard's horn rings through the thickly peopled streets.  The windows are full of faces.  There are gaping clusters on the street corners.  In a twinkling more the wheels awake hollow echoes from the Harlem River Bridge, and the Tally Ho rolls out upon the Southern Boulevard.

What a day it is there!  The horizon is steel blue.  The gloomy profiles of the institutions on the Island are sharply defined against it.  And the round circle of the sun glows over them like an escaped spirit glorying in its release.  Away swings the coach at a rattling pace, whip cracking, horn winding and hoof-beats ringing musically below.  Between the side stretches of grass land sweeping up to the hills, through reaches of wood where the trees stand thick and fast and the gray of winter is not thawed from their holes and branches, between nicely clipped lawns bordered with box, or quaint old lodges with fantastic gateways, past stately gray mansions upon heights and far off villas peeping through the trees, it rocks and sways; now the cynosure of a lot of wayside eyes, now alone and unnoticed and again hailed and pursued by cheery hurrahs.  From one or two taverns by the way are pictures of the coach itself suspended with flags and bunting about it.  Groups of rustic-looking people came out to see it.  Men in the fields stop their work to wave it a greeting.

WEST FARMS AROUSED.

And now low-lying Casanova and the Hoes and the Simpsons' estates all passed the Tally-Ho rolls up a hill, wheels around and comes slap-dash into the heart of West Farms.  There it is 'Hurrah!' from the window.  'Hurrah!' from the door.  The shopman steps out and waves his hand.  His customers crowd after him and do likewise.  Children bawl themselves hoarse.  Dogs bark.  The sleepy town awakes in a clamor and chased by its merry noises the coach rolls on and crosses the Bronx.  This is the first time it has gone over it here.  The direct road to Pelham from the southern Boulevard is being macadamized, the bridge is under repair and a detour of a mile and a half has had to be taken in consequence.  Up hill now and down dale through that heavy road from West Farms.  The trees shut in the view on either side.  Pools glimmer by the way.  The hoarse croaking of frogs comes from the marshes.  Over another hill, and now the great red front of the Catholic Protectory suddenly bursts out in the sunlight upon its bare plateau like the geni-begotten palace of Aladdin.  The coach plunges past it, past its factories and outhouses, rising around so spruce and bright and cleanly, and then the horn rings out and the horses bring up before the Swan Inn, at Unionport.  Now two bays, Major and Olly, are the leaders.  Brown Jumbo is the off wheeler and Tom, a light bay, the near wheeler.  The whip cracks.  'Tooty-too-too' goes the horn and away they sweep again.  The coach has been expected here.  Every one knows the bright yellow drag.  Old men hobble to the doors to wave big bandannas.  Old women shake aprons and shawls.  Little bits of toddlers stand dumbfounded with eyes like saucers, and a batch of children just out of school run themselves out of breath after it.  The water of Westchester Creek shimmers under a yellow flood pouring full from the zenith.  The lands beyond are bright as they can be.  The coach posts along bravely, for it must be close on time.  Over a bright level stretch of green are Hunter's Racing Stables.  The acres of the Waterbury estate come down to the stone wall at the road side, where the young of the family are stationed afoot and on ponyback to greet the Tally-Ho.  Lorillard's place comes next, with the old Arcularius Hotel, once the stopping place of the coach, now given over and standing on the hill without its old life and bustle.  It is high noon by the sun.  The horses, touched by the whip, forge ahead.  The harness rings.  The wheels turn up the dust.  The coach sways and bounds, and shoots ahead.  In the purple haze before it something is shining.  It is water -- the water of Pelham Bay.  And just beside it, gay with flags and streamers, and festooned with bunting from roof to doorway, is the Pelham Bridge Hotel.  Fownes toots merrily, a lot of onlookers hurrah and the horses merrily, a lot of onlookers hurrah and the horses, brought up on their haunches, stand at the door, whence Landlord Robert Spurge comes to bid all welcome.

AT EASE IN THE INN.

Landlord Spurge, who kept Colonel Kane's old stopping place, the Huguenot House, at New Rochelle, has come down to Pelham Bridge now, and his hotel is to be the terminus of the Tally Ho's route hereafter.  It is reached on this opening trip a few minutes after noon, as that space was devoted to making the detour occasioned by the repairing of the old Pelham road.  But all is ready here.  The house is in gala dress to honor the occasion.  The neighbors are around all smiling and agape.  And having rested, the party are marshalled by Landlord Spurge into the dining room.  What a quaint bit of a room it is! -- the room of all rooms for a coaching party.  There are odd old pictures on the walls; curious and antique looking pieces of furniture are scattered around; grotesque, old-fashioned plates and bowls are tucked in racks and shelves.  There are stuffed birds, with legends hitched to them, and a general flavor of homely, sociable ease about it all that eminently befits the occasion.  Dinner is served.  And such a dinner!  Nothing with foreign names and tastes.  Not a bit of it.  Robust, hearty fare fit for the road and roadsters.  Rare, juicy beef, fowl done to a nicety, mellow strawberries and cream, with such an atmosphere and such surroundings as would make a glutton of the veriest dyspeptic.

There was a rest after dinner.  The coach is scheduled to leave Pelham at 3:45 P. M.  Meantime the party scattered about the spot which, with its inlet sweeping off Soundward, its green fields and remote woodland patches, is as lovely a scene as Westchester county contains.  Mr. Oliver Iselin, sweeping by with his equipage, made a flying call upon the party.  Another friend dropped in and then the road home was taken.

Once the Tally-Ho had passed the people living by the way knew it was soon to return and they awaited it.  The rumble of the canary drag and the note of the guard's horn were everywhere the signal for the good folk of the neighborhood to swarm out of doors and wave their good wishes.  Troops of little children had plucked bunches of flowers and tossed them into the flying vehicle or pursued it in hopes to hand them to the guard.  What with flowers and music Fownes had his hands full for a long time.  And now up the road something flashes and gleams in the sunlight, and borne on the crisp air come the notes of instruments and the rattle of drums.  As the coach nears its stopping place, the Swan Inn, it is explained.  The juvenile brass band of the Catholic Protectory have come down to serenade the coaching party in broad daylight, and as the horses are being changed the little fellows blow and finger cornet and trombone right knowingly and sturdily thump the drums.  The proficiency of the little band is a surprise, and their music floats after the Tally-Ho as it sweeps homeward with bay Dandy at the near wheel, dark brown Guardsman at the off one, and two chestnuts, Billy and Pelham, leading.  It goes spinning along the Southern Boulevard, and all is gay and pleasurable till the coach approaches the track of the freight car-road running down to Port Morris.

A SPICE OF DANGER.

It has capped a hilly rise and is going down upon the rail when a sudden spout of steam rises over a knoll on the right and the ominous snort of a steam engine is heard.  The horses have full headway and are making for the track.  And now the locomotive shows its grim, dark length moving steadily down upon the carriage way.  It is a trying moment.  But Colonel Kane is equal to it.  He gives the horses their head, lays on the whip and like a flash the rail is cleared and the Tally-Ho goes rolling on while the steam engine, with the driver standing startled at the valve, drags past far behind it.  There is a noisy reception at Harlem, cheers along the road and the coach rolls through the Central Park, which is swarming with equipages.  There are salutes for it on every side, greetings for it everywhere, and through the crowd and jingle and murmur of Fifth avenue it passes up to the door of the Brunswick, where, at a quarter past five P. M., Fownes' horn blows the last note of the opening trip of the Pelham coach for the season of '82."

Source:  AGAIN ON THE ROAD -- The Tally-Ho's First Trip Through the Freshening Country, N.Y. Herald, May 2, 1882, Quadruple Sheet, p. 10, cols. 1-2.  

*          *          *          *          *

Below is a list of articles and blog postings that I previously have posted regarding the subject of "Coaching to Pelham."  

Bell, Blake A., Col. Delancey Kane and "The Pelham Coach" (Sep. 2003).

Wed., Apr. 14, 2010:  Col. Delancey Kane Changes the Timing and Route of The Pelham Coach in 1876.

Tue., Sep. 08, 2009:  1877 Advertisement with Timetable for the Tally Ho Coach to Pelham.

Mon., Mar. 23, 2009:  The Greyhound and the Tantivy-- The Four-in-Hand Coaches that Succeeded Col. Delancey Kane's "Tally-Ho" to Pelham.

Fri., Jan. 16, 2009: The Final Trip of the First Season of Col. Delancey Kane's "New-Rochelle and Pelham Four-in-Hand Coach Line" in 1876.

Thu., Jan. 15, 2009:  The First Trip of Col. Delancey Kane's "New-Rochelle and Pelham Four-in-Hand Coach Line" on May 1, 1876.

Thu., Mar. 06, 2008:  Auctioning the Tantivy's Horses at the Close of the 1886 Coaching Season.

Wed., Mar. 05, 2008:  Coaching to Pelham: The Tantivy Has an Accident on its Way to Pelham in 1886.  

Thu., Jan. 24, 2008:  An Account of the First Trip of Colonel Delancey Kane's Tally-Ho to Open the 1880 Coaching Season.

Tuesday, Jan. 8, 2008: Brief "History of Coaching" Published in 1891 Shows Ties of Sport to Pelham, New York

Thursday, August 3, 2006: Images of Colonel Delancey Kane and His "Pelham Coach" Published in 1878.

Wednesday, September 28, 2005: Taunting the Tantivy Coach on its Way to Pelham: 1886.

Wednesday, July 27, 2005: 1882 Engraving Shows Opening of Coaching Season From Hotel Brunswick to Pelham Bridge.

Thu., Jun. 09, 2005:  Coaching to Pelham: Colonel Delancey Astor Kane Did Not Operate the Only Coach to Pelham.

Fri., Feb. 11, 2005:  Col. Delancey Kane's "Pelham Coach", Also Known as The Tally-Ho, Is Located.

Bell, Blake A., Col. Delancey Kane and "The Pelham Coach", The Pelham Weekly, Vol. XII, No. 38, Sept. 26, 2003, p. 1, col. 1.


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Monday, July 28, 2014

Additional 19th Century References to Baseball Being Played in Pelham


For many years I have researched the history of baseball in the Town of Pelham.  At the close of today's posting to the Historic Pelham Blog I have posted an extensive list of articles and postings I have written regarding 19th century baseball in the Town of Pelham.

Today's posting to the Historic Pelham Blog transcribes articles that briefly reference baseball games played (or scheduled to be played) in the Town of Pelham in the late 19th century.    


A 19th Century Baseball Game as It Likely
Was Played in Pelham.

Immediately below is the text of each article including the brief reference, in each instance, to the baseball game.  Of course, there are many other historically-significant, non-baseball references contained in each article.  For that reason, in each instance, I have transcribed the entirety of each article rather than merely quoting the portion relating to the baseball game.  By way of examples . . . 

Together the various baseball references show that:  (1) on Sunday, April 28, 1895, the Elmhursts of Yonkers defeated the Pelhamville baseball team 12-7 in a nine-inning game; (2) a game between the Staten Islanders of New Brighton and the Oak Hills of Mt. Vernon was scheduled on the "Pelhamville Base Ball grounds' (likely Brickner's Grounds) on Sunday, June 23, 1895, at 3:00 p.m. with an admission charge of fifteen cents; (3) on Sunday, June 9, 1895, the Gorham Base Ball Club defeated a Staten Island team 6 to 2 in a game witnessed by "a large number of people" at the Pelhamville Base Ball grounds"; (4) on Wednesday, August 26, 1896, the final youth baseball game in a series between the Pelham Manor Baseball Team and the "Juveniles of Pelham" was played on the "latter's grounds" with the Pelham Manor team winning the game and the series and thus receiving a "breast protector" (catcher's chest protector) donated by "Mr. Webster";  (5) a baseball game was scheduled to be played on Sunday, June 16, 1895, at 3:00 p.m. at the "Pelhamville Base Ball grounds" between the Gorham Base Ball Club and the Elmhursts of Yonkers; (6)  a baseball game was scheduled to be played between a Pelhamville team and an Eastchester team at "Brickner's grounds" on Sunday, October 7, 1894; and (7) two baseball games were scheduled to be played "at the grounds in Pelham" on Sunday, June 25, 1899 with the B. and O. Tips playing the Healy Base Ball Club at 9:30 a.m. and the Pastime Athletic Club playing the Pelham Base Ball Club at "about" 3:00 p.m.

From such disparate clues we can tease some interesting information.  During the spring, summer and fall of 1895, a wide variety of baseball teams traveled to the "Pelhamville Base Ball grounds" (likely Brickner's Grounds) to play ball on Sunday afternoons at 3:00 p.m.  The games served as local entertainment and could attract a "large number" of spectators.  On occasion, an admission of fifteen cents per person was charged.  The baseball grounds attracted clubs that traveled to play there even though they were not playing the Pelhamville team.

The articles quoted below, in addition to their relevance to baseball history, indicate:  (1) when the two stairwells that give pedestrian access to the railroad bridge over Fifth Avenue were being built; (2) that there was a nasty dispute between Pelham Manor and Pelham over gas line improvements that one company wanted to offer to Pelham Manor but not to Pelham; and (3) when the special election was held regarding whether to incorporate the Village of North Pelham.  

"PELHAM.
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THE MOUNT VERNON NEWS is on sale at Lyman's Drug Store, Pelham.
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David Lyon, Jr., spent Sunday with friends at Delaware Water Gap, Pa.

James Reilley has moved into the house recently vacated by John Lourey on Fifth avenue.  

The Rev. C. Winter Bolton and wife have returned from a short outing, spent near Philadelphia.

Miss Harper of New York city, formerly of this place, is visiting at the home of Miss Fern Lyon.

A foreclosure sale of three of Mr. Bard's cottages on Third avenue took place last Tuesday at noon.  They were bought in at $3,100 and $3,200.

A. G. C. Fletcher of Pelhamdale avenue has gone to the Maine woods for a few days.  His family, who have been summering there, will accompany him on his return.  

George Pierson has been lying ill at his home since Wednesday when he was stricken with paralysis.  At latest report he was resting easy.  But his advanced age makes his entire recovery doubtful.

Philip Stead of Fourth avenue has received a patent on a double action screw propeller.  It will be given a trial shortly on one of the Trans Atlantic greyhounds.  It is claimed by experts that the trial trip is bound to be a record breaker.  

The story, which was extensively circulated that the house of Mr. Bienz was entered by sneak thieves last Saturday and a large amount of clothing stolen, was learned to be a fabrication, and Hoosier, who was interviewed on the subject, wishes it denied.

The final game in the series between the Pelham Manor baseball team and the Juveniles of Pelham was played at the latter's grounds last Wednesday [i.e., Wednesday, August 26, 1896] and resulted in a victory for the Pelham Manors who also win the series and the breast protector offered by Mr. Webster.  Score, 6 to 5.  The Pelhams will challenge again.

Mrs. John Dillon, formerly of this town, died at her home in Mount Vernon Sunday last after a lingering illness.  Mrs. Dillon was for many years a resident of Pelhamville.  She was respected by all her acquaintances and on her removal to Mount Vernon left many warm friends behind who will learn of her death with regret.

The Hobo club was camping at Huckleberry Island Saturday and Sunday, and report a great time.  Sunday some of them went fishing.  Mattie Hermann said that blackfishing was too 'dead slow' for him, so he took a shark-hook along and was rewarded by catching a young shark, which gave him all the sport he wanted before he got it landed.  It weighed about twenty-five pounds and was exhibited about town Sunday night.  Next time they go they will all take shark hooks, and at their next regular meeting will likely change the name of their organization to the Shark club.

Tomorrow (Saturday) is to be held the special election, from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m., to decide whether that portion of the Town of Pelham which lies north of the New Haven railroad tracks, shall be incorporated as the Village of North Pelham and as such assume the modern improvements obtainable, and advance to a place with, and be recognized by the other thriving modern towns and villages in this vicinity, or reject incorporation and its advantages and remain as it has been for the last forty years, a missing link between Mount Vernon and New Rochelle, and rightly dubbed 'No Man's Land.'  Its an issue between the 'modern hustlers' and the 'old settlers.'  The majority will win and it will be mighty small which ever way it goes."

Source:  PELHAM, Mount Vernon News [Mount Vernon, NY], Aug. 28, 1896, Vol. IV, No. 187, p. 4, col. 4.

"BASE BALL.
-----

--A fine game of base ball will be played to-morrow [i.e., Sunday, June 23, 1895] on the Pelhamville Base Ball grounds, when the Staten Islanders, of New Brighton, and the Oak Hills of Mt. Vernon, will cross bats.  The game will be called at 3 p.m.  Admission to the grounds will be fifteen cents.

--The Park Side A. C. team will play the Lexow Base Ball team of New York this Saturday afternoon at 3 o'clock on lower Church street."

Source:  BASE BALL, New Rochelle Pioneer, Jun. 22, 1895, Vol. XXXV, No 13, p. 8, col. 3.

"SPORTING NOTES.
-----

--A game of ball was played Sunday last [i.e., Sunday, June 9, 1895] on the Pelhamville Base Ball grounds between the Gorham B. B. C. and a club from Staten Island.  The game was a very exciting and interesting one throughout, and was witnessed by a large number of people.  The score at the finish stood six to two in favor of the Gorhams.

--A game will be played to-morrow [i.e., Sunday, June 16, 1895] on the Pelhamville Base Ball grounds between the Gorhams and the Elmhursts, of Yonkers.  Game will be called at 3 p.m.

--An interesting game of base ball will be played at Van Nest on the Protectory grounds, to-morrow, when the renowned Cuban Giants will meet the Emeralds.  This will be the only chance this season to see the colored champions in this vicinity, and a large number of our base ball enthusiasts will undoubtedly take advantage of the opportunity.  Game called at 3:30 p.m."

Source:  SPORTING NOTES, New Rochelle Pioneer, Jun. 15, 1895, Vol. XXXV, No. 12, p. 8, col. 3.

"Pelhamville.

The Chronicle may be obtained in Pelhamville and vicinity from Master Fred L. Anderson who will deliver it at residence.
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The following persons from the Town of Pelham have been drawn by the Commissioner of Jurors, to serve as petit jurors for the May term of the County Court and Court of Sessions, which commences Monday the 6th inst.  Mr. John Case, Mr. Mosses [sic] C. Bell, Mr. Joseph May, Mr. Osman Reynolds, and Mr. Martin Stephenhoffer.

The entertainment given last Thursday evening at the Court House by the Church of the Covenant, was fairly attended.  The musical part of the program consisted of two excellently rendered piano duets by Miss Ida Berlet and Miss Tompkins, and two violin solos by Mr. Griffith which were heartily applauded.  The literary part of it comprised a lecture by Mr. Arthur H. Eyles on 'Which is the Better; a Ton of Gold or a Ton of Coal? or Seeing is not always Believing.'  Although this was Mr. Eyles' first appearance on an eastern platform, his lecture was an enteresting [sic] one, being illustrated with some chemical experiments.  The proceeds are to be added to the fund for the renovating of the church edifice.

The ladies of the Church of the Redeemer held a missionary meeting on Thursday afternoon last at the rectory.  Miss Ford of First avenue, a returned missionary from Syria, made a very pleasing address in which she told of her work in the above country.

The Juvenile Hose Company are having their hose cart made by Gleason & Bailey.  It will be completed on or about the 15th inst.

Mr. J. Dillon and family of Third avenue are now esconsed [sic] in their new residence in East Mount Vernon.

Mr. William Dillon has recovered from a recent illness.  

Mr. Benjamin Harwood of Pelham Heights rendered two beautiful tenor solos at the services of the First Methodist Church of Mount Vernon, last Sunday.  

Mr. Charles H. Merritt is slowly recovering from the effects of a recent accident.

On Sunday, June 23rd Bishop Henry C. Potter will visit the Church of the Redeemer.  The rite of confirmation will be administered at this time.  

The Alpha Social Club holds its regular meeting to-morrow evening at the residence of the Misses Berlet.

Mr. John Henderson and family are soon to remove to New York City.  

The Pelhamville Whist Club met last Friday at the residence of Mr. and Mrs. Servass Gregoor, Second avenue.  A number of the members were present and all spent a delightful evening in playing whist.  Later a bounteous supper was served by the charming hostess.

Mr. James Reilly has leased the house on First avenue formerly occupied by Mr. A. L. White.  

The railroad authorities are building two flights of stairs one on each side of the Fifth avenue bridge.  This will afford much better access to the depot.
Mrs. Whitely and family have left Pelhamville and have gone to New York to live.

Mr. John Conlon will soon reside in Mr. August Godfrey's house on Second avenue.  

Mr. Kennedy is now residing in his house on Fourth avenue.  

Mr. George W. Bard has rented two of his cottages on Fourth avenue near Fourth street.  

The trolley on the Pelhamville division of the Union Eelectric [sic] Railroad is now compelled to stop at Columbus avenue on account of the macadamizing and grading of East Third street through which it runs.  

A team belonging to Walsh Bros. and attached to one of their milk wagons ran away one day last week in New Rochelle.  They were stopped however before any serious damage was done.  

Three new houses are soon to be erected on Fourth avenue between Second and Third streets by George W. Bard.  They are to cost $3,000 each.

The Elmhursts of Yonkers defeated the Pelhamville base-ball team in a game played last Sunday [i.e., Sunday, April 28, 1895] on Brickner's grounds.  Nine innings were played, the score at the conclusion of the last being 12 to 7.

Every year the public school pupils observe Arbor Day by rendering an appropriate program and by planting small trees and shrubs, thus making an enteresting [sic] study in agriculture, which is witnessed by a large gathering of the parents and friends of the scholars.  The program which has been arranged for to-morrow by Principal Hill and his corps of assistants is as follows:

Salute to the flag......The School
'The Red, White and Blue'...Chorus
Address...James Conklin
Arbor Day Poem...W.J. Evert
Coming of Spring...Elmer Anderson
The Bright May Month...Chorus
The Petrified Fern...Fred L. Anderson
Lessons from the Flowers...Mabel Wright
Flowers of Nations...Fern Lyon
Nature's Awakening...Fritz Ernst
Lovely May...Chorus
Were I the Sun...Willie Ernst
Somebody's Knocking...Essie McGalliard
The Little Cricket...Martha Theirfelder
The Lilac...Ethel Jones
Merry Spring Time...Chorus
Look Up...May Harrington
Maze Ferns...Josie Gregoor
Little Wild Flower...Sadie Van Buskirk
Flower Dance...Chorus
Off to the Woods...Roy Johnson
Spring Morning...Agnes Ernst
Daffy Down Dilly...Annie Fountain
Summer Time...Chorus
Two Little Buds...H. Van Buskirk
Recitation...Lulu Young
Cunning Crow...Willie Penny
Two Roses...Vida Barker
The Birdies' Ball...Chorus
Quotations
'America'...The School
Planting of Trees
-----

That Gas Question.

Editor Chronicle:  

It would probably be well if the residents of Pelhamville understood the true inwardness of this question.

A proposition was recently made by an outside gas company to establish a plant lay mains &c., and supply Pelham with a superior quality of gas at rates very much below that offered by a local company.  The former company would expend between fifty and sixty thousand dollars within our territory, this being liable to taxation, would be beneficial to our town in that respect, besides giving employment to a number of our citizens.  The local company above referred to, then lowered its bid a trifle, but would not agree to include Pelhamville within the territory to be supplied.

At a meeting of the Board of Village Trustees of Pelham Manor, recently held to consider the matter, a suggestion was made that no contract be made with any gas company that would exclude any portion of the town from its benefits. A member of the Board, in the spirit, of not the exact language of a certain magnite [sic] exclaimed:  'The public (Pelhamville) be d------.'  The short-sightedness on the part of this large land-owner is to be lamented.  Can he not perceive that improvements made to any part of his adjacent territory also tends to improve his holdings?

Why should this company object to include Pelhamville, unless they see in the near future, larger rates than agreed to under the proposed contract with Pelham Manor.  Pelhamville to-day would have fifty per cent more consumers of gas than Pelham Manor, and taking into consideration our rapid growth, in less than three years would have three to one.

The solution of this whole matter lies wholly under the control of the Road Commissioners.  Will they also in defiance of the wishes of a large majority of their constituents say 'The public be d----'?

Let us hope that they are more public spirited, and will utterly decline to permit any gas company to get a foothold in our town without binding them to treat all sections fairly.

Would it not be better for all concerned to bury any prejudices or jealousies that may have existed?  Our rapid growing community must, in the nature of things improve, not retrograde.  Pelham Heights and Pelhamville are a unit on this important matter.  Will Pelham Manor unite with us?

PRO BONO PUBLICO."

Source: Pelhamville, The Chronicle [Mount Vernon, NY], May 2, 1895, p. 4, cols. 1-2.

"OUR NEARBY NEIGHBORS.
------
Pelhamville.

The Chronicle may be obtained in Pelhamville and vicinity from Master Fred L. Anderson who will deliver it at residence.

Mr. and Mrs. Marion Pierson have returned from their Washington wedding tour and received the usual serenade from the Pelhamville band, who were as untiring as ever.

Mr. Augustus Barker has recently become a benedict; last week he was married to Miss Nellie Gleason of this village, Rev. C. W. Bolton [Cornelius Winter Bolton] officiating.  A reception was given on Monday evening at the residence of Mr. L. Brotherton [Loftus Brotherton].

The Pelhamville nine will play the Eastchester's [sic] next Sunday [i.e., Oct. 7, 1894] at Brickner's grounds.

Mr. William Cockroft is making preparations to open a grocery store in one of the offices in the Pelham Building.  Mr. Cockcroft has been connected for some months past with the grocery business of Mr. Baker at Mount Vernon."

Source:  OUR NEARBY NEIGHBORS -- Pelhamville, The Chronicle [Mount Vernon, NY], Oct. 4, 1894, p. 4, col. 1.  

"BASE BALL AT PELHAM.
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Two Games A. M. and P. M.
-----

There will be two games of baseball played at the grounds in Pelham tomorrow.

In the morning at about 9:30 o'clock the B. and O. Tips will lock horns with the Healy B. B. C. and from all accounts the game will be for blood.

Every player on each side is a crack-a-jack at getting his eye on the ball, especially when he has the cue and some wonderful batting is expected.  It is to be hoped [that] the fielders will be able to catch the balls, as in this game pockets will not be allowed.

Mr. Otis Odell is manager of the B. and O. Tips and Mr. Matthews Duke occupies the same position for the Healys.

The B. and O. Tips are composed of Messrs. Odell, B. Ballon, Duffy, Magee, Hendrickson, Collins, Sillery, F. Fallon and Sharkey.

Messrs. Duffy and Fallon will be the battery for the B and O. Tips, and Messrs. Farrington and Malone will fill the same positions on the Healys.

In the afternoon the Pastime Athletic Clubs' nine, of this city, will meet the Pelham Base Ball Club at about 3:00 o'clock [sic].

Lots of sport is promised at both games especially in the morning when the two teams, composed of 'knights of the cue,' will battle for supremacy."

Source:  BASE BALL AT PELHAM -- Two Games A. M. and P. M., Mount Vernon Daily Argus [Mount Vernon, NY], Jun. 24, 1899, Vol. XXIX, No. 2,221, p. 1, col. 3.

*          *           *          *          *

Below is a listing, with links, of my previous postings and a published article on the topic of 19th century baseball in Pelham.

Tue., Apr. 08, 2014:  More 19th Century References to Baseball in the Town of Pelham.


Thu., Jan. 28, 2010:   News About Pelham Manor and Pelhamville in 1895 - Lighting Districts, Gas for the Village, Baseball and More.

Tue., Dec. 15, 2009:  Baseball Games Played by the City Island Beldenites and the City Island Rivals in 1884.  

Mon., Dec. 14, 2009:  Baseball Games Played by the City Island Shamrocks in 1889.  

Fri., Dec. 11, 2009:  Earliest Reference Yet to Baseball Played in Pelham.  

Thu., Dec. 10, 2009:  More 19th Century Baseball and Firefighting References

Wed., Dec. 9, 2009:  City Island Shamrocks Base Ball Club Changed its Name to the Minnefords in 1888.

Wed., Nov. 25, 2009:  Even More Early References to Baseball Played in Pelham.

Tue., Nov. 24, 2009:  Yet Another Reference to Early Baseball in Pelham.

Mon., Nov. 23, 2009:  Additional Brief Accounts of Baseball Played in Pelham in the 19th Century.

Fri., Nov. 20, 2009:  More Accounts of Early Baseball Played in Pelham.

Fri., Nov. 13, 2009:  1894 Account of Developments in Pelham Including a Reference to a Baseball Game Played that Year.

Thur., Nov. 12, 2009:  More Early References to Baseball Played in Pelham.

Wed., Sep. 30, 2009:   Score of June 1, 1887 Baseball Game Between the Country Club and The Knickerbocker Club.

Fri., Mar. 20, 2009:   Another Reference to 19th Century Baseball in Pelham.

Tue., Mar. 4, 2008:   Another Brief Reference to 19th Century Baseball in Pelham.

Mon., Nov. 26, 2007:  Box Score of a Baseball Game Played on Travers Island in Pelham Manor in July 1896.

Wed., Nov. 21, 2007:  Baseball on Travers Island During the Summer of 1897.

Fri., Jul. 20, 2007:  Account of Early Baseball in Pelham: Pelham vs. the New York Athletic Club on Travers Island in 1897.

Fri., Nov. 10, 2006: The Location of Another Early Baseball Field in Pelham.

Mon., Oct. 9, 2006:   Reminiscences of Val Miller Shed Light on Late 19th Century Baseball in Pelham and the Early Development of the Village of North Pelham.

Thu., Mar. 23, 2006:  Baseball Fields Opened on the Grounds of the Westchester Country Club in Pelham on April 4, 1884.  

Tue., Jan. 31, 2006:  Another Account of Baseball Played in Pelham in the 1880s Is Uncovered.  

Thu., Oct. 6, 2005:   Does This Photograph Show Members of the "Pelham Manor Junior Base Ball Team"?

Thu., Sep. 15, 2005:  Newspaper Item Published in 1942 Sheds Light on Baseball in 19th Century Pelham.  

Thu., Feb. 10, 2005:  New Discoveries Regarding Baseball in 19th Century Pelham.  

Bell, Blake A., Baseball in Late 19th Century Pelham, The Pelham Weekly, Vol. XIII, No. 17, Apr. 23, 2004, p. 8, col. 2.

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